Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

 

 

Rocky Balboa (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jump to: navigation, search

“Rocky VI” redirects here. For the parody by Finnish director Aki Kaurismäki, see Rocky VI (1986 film).
Rocky Balboa
Directed by Sylvester Stallone
Produced by Charles Winkler
Billy Chartoff
David Winkler
Kevin King
Written by Sylvester Stallone
Starring Sylvester Stallone
Burt Young
Antonio Tarver
Milo Ventimiglia
Geraldine Hughes
Tony Burton
James Francis Kelly III
Lou DiBella
Music by Bill Conti
Cinematography J. Clark Mathis
Editing by Sean Albertson
Studio Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Columbia Pictures
(Sony Pictures Entertainment)
Revolution Studios
Distributed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release date(s) December 20, 2006 (2006-12-20)
Running time 100 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $24 million
Gross revenue $155,721,132[1]

Rocky Balboa (also known as: Rocky VI) is the sixth and final film in the Rocky franchise, directed by and starring Sylvester Stallone. The film, which was also written by Stallone who plays underdog boxer Rocky Balboa, is the sixth film in the Rocky series that began with the Academy Award-winning Rocky thirty years earlier in 1976. The film portrays Balboa in retirement, a widower living in Philadelphia, and the owner and operator of a local Italian restaurant called “Adrian’s,” named after his late wife.

Rocky Balboa was produced as another sequel to the Academy Award-winning Rocky. According to Stallone, he was “negligent” in the production of Rocky V leaving him and many of the fans disappointed with the presumed end of the series. Stallone also mentioned that the storyline of Rocky Balboa parallels his own struggles and triumphs in recent times.[2]

In addition to Stallone, the film stars Burt Young as Paulie, Rocky’s brother-in-law, and real-life boxer Antonio Tarver as Mason “The Line” Dixon, the heavyweight division champion in the film. Boxing promoter Lou DiBella plays himself in the movie and acts as Dixon’s promoter in the film. Milo Ventimiglia plays Rocky’s son Robert, now an adult. It also features the return of two minor characters from the original movie into larger roles in this film: Marie, the young woman that Rocky attempts to steer away from trouble; and Spider Rico, the first opponent that Rocky is shown fighting in the original film. The film also holds many references to people and objects from previous installments in the series, especially the first.

The film was released on December 20, 2006, by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Columbia Pictures and Revolution Studios. It exceeded box office expectations and critical reaction was positive. The film was released in several formats for its home media release, and DVD sales have exceeded $34 million.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Plot

Rocky, in his late fifties and retired from boxing for roughly twenty years, lives a quiet life as a widower, Adrian having died from cancer years earlier. He runs a small but successful Italian restaurant named after her, where he regales his patrons with stories of his past. He also battles personal demons involving his grief over Adrian’s death, the changing times, and his eroding relationship with his son Robert, a struggling corporate employee. Paulie, Rocky’s brother-in-law and longtime friend, continues to support him whenever he can.

Late one night, Rocky reunites with a much older “Little” Marie; a once mischievous neighborhood girl (whom he first met in Rocky) now working as a bartender at a tavern Rocky once frequented, and a single parent of a teenaged son born out of wedlock: Stephenson, nicknamed “Steps.” Rocky’s friendship with the two quickly blossoms over the following weeks, and Steps takes to him as a father figure. Meanwhile on the professional boxing circuit, the newly crowned world heavyweight champion, Mason “The Line” Dixon, reigns undefeated, but he is ridiculed for having never gone up against a real contender. This frustrates the champ, causing tension with the public and his promoters, and encouraging him to return to his roots – the small gym he first trained in, as well as his old trainer who sagely tells him that he will inevitably earn back his respect through fighting a true opponent.

ESPN broadcasts a computer simulation of a fight between Rocky (in his prime) and Mason, likened to a modern-day version of The Super Fight that ends in a controversial KO victory for Balboa, further riling the champ. In contrast, the simulation inspires Rocky to take up boxing again — an intention that goes public when he successfully renews his license. Dixon’s promoters pitch the idea of holding a charity exhibition bout at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino in Las Vegas to bolster Dixon’s falling popularity. With some hesitation, both men agree to the match, creating a media buzz that stabs at Rocky’s has-been status and Dixon’s credibility. Robert later makes an effort to discourage Rocky from fighting, blaming his own personal failings on his father’s celebrity shadow, but Rocky rebukes him with some profound advice; that to succeed in life, “it ain’t about how hard you hit; it’s about how hard you can get hit, and keep moving forward,” and that blaming others won’t help him. The next day, father and son meet over Adrian’s grave and reconcile; Robert has quit his job to be at Rocky’s side. Rocky sets straight to training with Apollo Creed’s old trainer, Duke, who quickly surmises that the slow and arthritic Rocky can only compete by building his strength and punching power as much as possible, with sheer brute force his best option against Dixon.

The bout itself is a back and forth affair, with Dixon easily dominating the first round only to injure his left hand in the second on Rocky’s hip, after which Rocky makes a dramatic comeback; he manages to knock Dixon down himself, then continues to surprise the audience with his prowess and chin against the much younger and faster fighter. Dixon sends Rocky to one knee in the final round, but Rocky pulls himself to his feet for one last assault. The two opponents punish each other severely throughout the remainder of the final round, ending with both men still standing. Rocky thanks an appreciative Dixon for the fight, and leaves the ring to the adulation of the crowd as the result is announced: Dixon winning by split decision.

In the closing shot, Rocky returns home and visits Adrian’s grave again, thanking her for helping him: “Yo Adrian, we did it.”

[edit] Cast

  • Sylvester Stallone as Rocky Balboa, retired boxer and former two-time heavyweight champion.
  • Burt Young as Paulie Pennino, Rocky’s moody brother-in-law and best friend.
  • Milo Ventimiglia as Robert Balboa, Rocky’s only son.
  • Geraldine Hughes as Marie, a woman whom Rocky originally met over thirty years ago (as seen in the first installment of the movie series).
  • James Francis Kelly III as Stephenson (“Steps”), Marie’s son, whom Rocky befriends.
  • Tony Burton as Tony “Duke” Evers, Rocky’s trainer who has been his head cornerman since Balboa’s second fight with Clubber Lang in Rocky III. Duke previously trained Apollo Creed, who was Rocky’s nemesis in the first two films and later became his friend and head trainer in the third and fourth films.
  • Antonio Tarver as Mason “The Line” Dixon, Rocky’s opponent. Dixon is shown as the current heavyweight champion of the world, but a fighter who is not shown the same respect as Rocky was when he was the world champion.
  • Talia Shire as Adrian Balboa, was in the first few drafts of the script of what was originally called Rocky VI: Puncher’s Chance. At this point, the story revolved around Rocky running a youth hostel. However, writer Sylvester Stallone felt that the film lacked the necessary emotional impact it needed. So, he and Talia Shire came to an agreement that her character would be best left out of the film, as this would create an emotional chasm for Rocky from the very first moment of the film. To ensure that fans didn’t think she’d been written out of the film because of a dispute with Stallone or because she refused to be in it, Shire made a public statement supporting Stallone’s decision to kill off the character. Her character does not appear in the film except during flashbacks, using footage from earlier Rocky films.

[edit] Filming and production

[edit] Budget and timeline

Filming began in December 2005 in Las Vegas, Nevada. In 2006, it moved to Los Angeles, California and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[3] The production budget on the 38-day shoot was projected to be $24 million. The film was scheduled for release during the President’s Day holiday in 2007, but was moved up to right before Christmas 2006.[4] In late March 2006, the first movie teaser was released on the Internet. The full-length trailer accompanied the theatrical release of Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest on July 7 in select theaters.

[edit] Casting

Rocky Balboa gives nods to previous installments via the casting. The most obvious is the return of Stallone, Young, and Burton—the only actors to portray the same characters in all six installments. Tarver’s appearance in the film marks the sixth time an active professional boxer has appeared in the series. Previously, Joe Frazier (Rocky), Pedro Lovell (Rocky), Roberto Durán (Rocky II), Tommy Morrison (Rocky V), and Michael Williams (Rocky V) have appeared in the series. Stallone initially wanted Roy Jones, Jr. to portray Dixon, but after Jones did not return Stallone’s phone calls, he tapped Antonio Tarver to fill the role.[5] Tarver accidentally knocked out Stallone during the filming of one of the segments of the fight.[6]

The character of Marie appeared in the original Rocky; she was portrayed by Jodi Letizia.[7] For the final film, Marie is portrayed by Geraldine Hughes. (Although Letizia did reprise the role for Rocky V, the sole scene in which she appeared was deleted. In it, Marie was homeless on the streets of Philadelphia.) Another recognizable character who appeared in the previous five films, sportscaster Stu Nahan, provided the commentary for the computer-generated fight between Dixon and Balboa. Nahan was part of the ringside commentary team during all the bouts in the first three films and the Apollo Creed/Ivan Drago fight in Rocky IV. He was diagnosed with lymphoma during the Rocky Balboa filming, though, and died on December 26, 2007.[8] Finally, Pedro Lovell, who portrayed Spider Rico in the original film, returns to the role in Rocky Balboa as a guest and later employee at Rocky’s restaurant.

A number of sports personalities portray themselves. Jim Lampley, Larry Merchant, and Max Kellerman comprise the ringside broadcast team (all three are commentators for HBO Boxing). Sportswriters such as Bert Sugar, Bernard Fernandez and Steve Springer also appear. As for actual boxers, Mike Tyson (who had retired by the film’s release) makes a cameo appearance, taunting Dixon as the fighter enters the ring. Lou DiBella, a real-life boxing promoter, portrays himself as Dixon’s promoter. Several of ESPN’s personalities also portray themselves. SportsCenter anchor Brian Kenny is the host of the fictional Then and Now series, while Cold Pizza and 1st and 10 hosts Jay Crawford, Dana Jacobson, Skip Bayless, and Woody Paige also appear. Ring announcer Michael Buffer appeared as himself, as did referee Joe Cortez.

Regarding his decision not to have Talia Shire reprise her role as Adrian, Stallone told USA Today that, “in the original script, she was alive. But it just didn’t have the same dramatic punch. I thought, ‘What if she’s gone?’ That would cut Rocky’s heart out and drop him down to ground zero.”[9] Shire herself said that, in her view, “The film has great regard for the process of mourning. Sly utilizes mourning to empower Rocky, and Adrian is made very mythical.”[9]

[edit] Script

A plot element from the fifth film is not addressed in Rocky Balboa’s plot. In the previous film, Rocky was diagnosed with brain damage and advised never to fight again. Stallone clarified this apparent inconsistency in an interview, remarking:

“When Rocky was diagnosed with brain damage, it must be noted that many athletes have a form of brain damage including football players, soccer players, and other individuals in contact sports such as rugby, etc. Rocky never went for a second opinion and yielded to his wife’s wishes to stop. So with the advent of new research techniques into brain damage, Rocky was found to be normal among fighters, and he was suffering the results of a severe concussion. By today’s standards Rocky Balboa would be given a clean bill of health for fighters.”[10]

[edit] Cinematography and fight choreography

While the dramatic portions of the movie are shot in an obviously cinematic style, the bout between Balboa and Dixon is shot in a number of different ways. The lead-in to the bout, as well as the first two rounds, are shot in a style similar to a major pay-per-view broadcast. Clips from fights in previous Rocky movies are used during the introductory teaser to introduce Balboa, while stock footage from actual Tarver fights, as well as footage from Dixon’s previous fight (shown at the beginning of the film) are used as clips for Dixon’s part of the teaser. The fight itself was shot in High Definition to further enhance the TV-style look of the fight.[10]

After the first two rounds, the bout is shot in a more “cinematic” style, reminiscent of the way the fights in the other Rocky films were shot. However, unlike the other films in the series, the fight is less choreographed and more improvised than previous installments and is closer to an actual boxing match than a choreographed fight.[11] This is a departure from the previous films, where every punch, feint, and step was carefully scripted and practiced.[12]

According to the behind-the-scenes documentary portions of the film’s DVD, there were slight continuity problems during the filming of the fight. This was said to have been due to the fact that real punches were thrown by both Stallone and Tarver, resulting in some swelling and nosebleeds earlier than scripted. The DVD release features an alternate ending in which Rocky wins the fight.

[edit] Music

Composed by Academy Award winner Bill Conti, the Rocky Balboa film score is both an updated composition of Rocky music and a tribute to the music that has been featured in previous Rocky films. Conti, who has acted as composer on every Rocky film except Rocky IV, chose to compose the score almost entirely from musical themes used in the previous movies. Only one original theme was written specifically for Rocky Balboa and that is the theme written to represent the character of Marie.

The roughly 40-minute score was recorded in the summer of 2006 at Capitol Studios in Hollywood, California. Conti chose to pre-record the string, brass and piano tracks and then have those tracks mixed with the work of a 44 piece orchestra which he conducted. He also performed all of the piano work himself which is something he has done with each movie for which he has composed the score. Stallone also was involved in every part of the process and attended several of the recording sessions.[13]

In addition to the score the film features original tracks performed by Natasha Bedingfield, Three 6 Mafia, and Frank Stallone as well as classic tracks such as Frank Sinatra’sHigh Hopes” and The Miracles‘ “Ooh Baby Baby“.[14] Of the original tracks the most significant is the Diane Warren song “Still Here”, performed by Bedingfield, which was reported to be the film’s theme in early articles.[15] Though it is still listed in the credits the song was dropped from the film.

[edit] Distribution

Rocky Balboa represents a partnership between Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Revolution Studios, and Columbia Pictures (Columbia’s corporate parent Sony holds a 20% stake in MGM). Since the Rocky series was originally produced and distributed by United Artists (now MGM’s subsidiary studio), the partners jointly decided that the film could and should take advantage of MGM’s newly reinvigorated domestic distribution apparatus.[16] 20th Century Fox handles its theatrical and DVD distributions outside of the United States and Canada, while Sony Pictures Home Entertainment handled its American and Canadian video distributions. In the Philippines and Switzerland, Fox released the film through joint ventures with Warner Bros. Entertainment. In Japan, the film was promoted by Fox as Rocky The Final. It opened across Japan on April 20, 2007.[17]

[edit] Critical response

The film was very well received by critics and fans alike. The film garners a “Certified Fresh” rating of 75% on the review aggregator website Rotten Tomatoes based on a sample of 173 reviews, with an average score of 6.5/10.[18] At the website Metacritic, which utilizes a normalized rating system, the film earned a favorable rating of 63/100 based on 33 reviews by mainstream critics.[19]

On the television show Ebert & Roeper, both Richard Roeper and guest reviewer Aisha Tyler gave the film a “thumbs up” rating.[20] Among other positive reviews were those from Variety,[21] David Edelstien of New York Magazine,[22] Ethan Alter of Premiere Magazine,[23] Victoria Alexander of Filmsinreview.com,[24] Jeanne Aufmuth of Palo Alto Weekly,[25] Brett Buckalew of Filmstew.com,[26] Hollywood Reporter,[27] and Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly.[28]

Some criticism came from Christy Lemire, who described the film as self-parody.[29] Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times also criticized the film’s premise as implausible and derivative, and the plot development as cursory, while Colm Andrew of the Manx Independent said the film “captures the look and feel of the first Rocky but becomes too much of a sentimental homage” and overall “there is little point in joining Stallone on this ultimately dull nostalgia trip”.[30]

Stallone was quoted as having told reporters that he would rather ‘…do something that he enjoyed badly, than feel bad about not doing something he enjoyed.’

The film was greeted warmly by the majority of the boxing community, with many experts believing the Rocky character is still a key symbol of the sport and that the boxing scenes were the most realistic of any film. On the DVD, Stallone attributes this to the fact that he used realistic sound-effects (the previous installments had become notorious for their unrealistic and loud sounds of punches landing) and the fact that both Stallone and Tarver threw real punches at each other.[31]

[edit] Box office

The film was an unexpected box office success and exceeded studio expectations grossing over three times the opening night estimates of (at best) $2,000,000 and doing so despite a harsh spell of winter weather.[32] The film not only finished third in its opening weekend, grossing $12,540,000,[33] but eventually became Stallone’s most successful starring role since 1993’s Cliffhanger[34] and the sixth highest grossing boxing film of all time, topped only by the first Rocky through IV and Clint Eastwood‘s Million Dollar Baby. and was nominated for an MTV award for best on screen duo.[35] Total U.S. box office gross receipts were $70,269,899 while the international gross stands at $85,449,806 making for a total worldwide gross of $155,721,132.[36]

[edit] Soundtrack

Whether the film Rocky Balboa has a soundtrack is subject to some debate. On December 26, 2006, Capitol Records released a CD titled Rocky Balboa: The Best of Rocky which had a logo and cover art that was identical to the film’s theatrical poster.

The CD itself contains short dialogue clips and musical tracks, some of which are remixes, from all the Rocky films. Notable though is that only three of its nineteen total tracks are from the Rocky Balboa film: two dialogue tracks and the Three 6 Mafia song “It’s a Fight” (The UK version contains the additional track “Still Here” by Natasha Bedingfield). This has led some to categorize the CD as a compilation while others suggest that it is a soundtrack and that the use of past material simply reflects the film’s extensive use of flashbacks.

Relevant to this debate is the absence of any compositions by Rocky IV composer Vince DiCola, except for the song “Hearts on Fire”, co-written by DiCola, Ed Fruge and Joe Esposito. DiCola is the only person, other than Bill Conti, to act as composer on a Rocky film and his work was used extensively on the 1991 compilation CD The Rocky Story: Songs From The Rocky Movies. The missing DiCola tracks are the only tracks on the 1991 CD that are not present on the new CD which indicates an effort to use only Rocky Balboa composer Conti’s tracks.[37]

[edit] Home release

Rocky Balboa is available in three formats: Blu-ray Disc, DVD, and UMD. It was released in Region 1 on March 20 and Region 2 on May 21, 2007. The film has made $35,622,998 in DVD sales.[1] Features on the Blu-ray Disc and DVD include: deleted scenes along with an alternate ending (where Rocky wins the split decision), bloopers, a commentary, and several featurettes. In addition, the Blu-ray version features all of the DVD’s content in 1080p High Definition Video.[38]

[edit] Video game

On December 13, 2006, it was officially announced by Ubisoft and MGM that a new Rocky video game, titled Rocky Balboa, was to be made exclusively for the PlayStation Portable handheld console. It was released on March 20, 2007, to coincide with the Blu-ray and DVD release.[39]

[edit] Notes

  1. ^ a b “Rocky Balboa”. The Numbers. http://www.the-numbers.com/movies/2006/RCKY6.php. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  2. ^ Schwartz, Missy (December 14, 2006). “‘Rocky’ Road”. Entertainment Weekly. http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,1570048,00.html. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  3. ^ “Rocky Balboa Filming Locations”. Movie Locations Guide. http://www.movielocationsguide.com/Rocky_Balboa/filming_locations. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  4. ^ Welkos, Robert W. (November 26, 2005). “Forever the underdog; A sixth ‘Rocky’ already is the butt of jokes, but producers are betting it can be a winner” (Fee required). Los Angeles Times. http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/latimes/access/931784561.html?dids=931784561:931784561&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:FT&date=Nov+26%2C+2005&author=Robert+W.+Welkos&pub=Los+Angeles+Times&desc=Forever+the+underdog%3B+A+sixth+%27Rocky%27+already+is+the+butt+of+jokes%2C+but+producers+are+betting+it+can+be+a+winner.&pqatl=google. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  5. ^ DHB (December 16, 2006). “Stallone has Issues with Roy Jones Jr”. Doghouse Boxing. Archived from the original on February 21, 2008. http://web.archive.org/web/20080221152824/http://www.doghouseboxing.com/chee/chee_121606.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  6. ^ “Stallone knocked out on ‘Rocky’ set”. Monsters and Critics. December 21, 2005. http://movies.monstersandcritics.com/news/article_1070546.php/Stallone_knocked_out_on_Rocky_set. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  7. ^ Template:Url=http://www.jodiletizia.com
  8. ^ “Retired L.A. Sportscaster Stu Nahan Dies At 81”. CBS2. December 26, 2007. Archived from the original on March 27, 2008. http://web.archive.org/web/20080327091126/http://cbs2.com/sports/Stu.Nahan.2.618339.html. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  9. ^ a b Keck, William (December 25, 2006). “Forever yo: Talia Shire’s Adrian”. USA Today. http://www.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2006-12-25-talia-shire_x.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  10. ^ a b Moriaty (December 1, 2006). “Round One With Sylvester Stallone Q&A!!”. Ain’t It Cool News. http://www.aintitcool.com/node/30861. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  11. ^ Zwecker, Bill (December 14, 2006). “”Rocky” climbs off the canvas”. Chicago Sun-Times. http://www.suntimes.com/entertainment/movies/172402,CST-FTR-rocky14.article. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  12. ^ Dutka, Elaine; J.D. Reed (June 14, 1982). “Winner and Still Champion”. Time. pp. 1–6. http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,950695-1,00.html. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  13. ^ Goldwasser, Dan (June 14, 2006). “Bill Conti scores Rocky Balboa”. Scoring Sessions. http://www.scoringsessions.com/news/54/. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  14. ^ “Rocky Balboa (2006) – Cast and Credits”. Yahoo! Movies. http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1809278368/cast. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  15. ^ “Natasha Bedingfield records ‘Rocky’ theme”. Yahoo! Music. August 10, 2006. http://music.yahoo.com/read/news/35074884. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  16. ^ “MGM to handle domestic distribution of “Rocky Balboa””. May 17, 2006. Archived from the original on December 10, 2006. http://web.archive.org/web/20061210180800/http://www.mgm.com/corp_news_releases.do?id=470. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  17. ^ “Rocky The Final”. Fox Japan. http://movies.foxjapan.com/rockythefinal/site/flash.html. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  18. ^ “Rocky Balboa”. Rotten Tomatoes. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/rocky_balboa/. Retrieved September 2, 2010. 
  19. ^ “Rocky Balboa”. Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/film/titles/rockybalboa?q=Rocky%20Balboa. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  20. ^ “Rocky Balboa”. At the Movies with Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert. http://bventertainment.go.com/tv/buenavista/atm/reviews.html?sec=6&subsec=Rocky+Balboa. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  21. ^ Koehler, Robert (December 15, 2006). “Rocky Balboa”. ‘Variety. http://www.variety.com/review/VE1117932317.html?categoryid=31&cs=1. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  22. ^ Edelstein, David. “Rocky Balboa”. New York Magazine. http://nymag.com/movies/listings/rv_52564.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  23. ^ Alter, Ethan (December 18, 2006). “Rocky Balboa”. Premiere Magazine. Archived from the original on January 3, 2007. http://web.archive.org/web/20070103093834/http://www.premiere.com/moviereviews/3345/rocky-balboa.html. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  24. ^ Alexander, Victoria (December 13, 2006). “A certified crowd pleaser. Stallone stayed true to Rocky. He gave Rocky back to us without dolling him up.”. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/rocky_balboa/articles/1562161/a_certified_crowd_pleaser_stallone_stayed_true_to_rocky_he_gave_rocky_back_to_us_without_dolling_him_up. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  25. ^ Aufmuth, Jeanne (December 22, 2006). “Rocky Balboa”. Palo Alto Weekly. Archived from the original on May 24, 2008. http://web.archive.org/web/20080524003236/http://paloaltoonline.com/movies/moviescreener.php?id=002462&type=long. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  26. ^ Buckalew, Brett. “The Bengay Balboa”. FilmStew.com. http://www.filmstew.com/showArticle.aspx?ContentID=15247. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  27. ^ “Review: ‘Rocky Balboa'” (Registration required). Hollywood Reporter. December 15, 2006. http://login.vnuemedia.com/hr/login/login_subscribe.jsp?id=5oqi%2BHOaP1Ii4cw0KvPMlj09VHoUU1ZntqHzmkNCG5YG9WAq6db9hzY%2FRuFNP72stnF4CGdDKE%2By%0Ai6JO2SiWBUpE1bMcCvQOKYcBDyJ1HYoEt9Yl1IPHmCKROG2UdFA94IPOHeWji5UUQfaYPQVf3Gd2%0AhWd7UtPFwxmqgWqUF54aPvv1fq16ETj6UMfNaZObHyrYArJSIu8cv%2BORZ9DfPbHGmqfLahwdUa03%0AZthBxLygNPLabW5eIM%2Bo%2BptXfsbvUcTWQi0I%2F%2BYFPNyHkkobYEYFxhSeLI8r7GefszTloxqauBiW%0AYHFGabKLok7ZKJYFSkTVsxwK9A4phwEPInUdisEo%2Fg2VAiG7. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  28. ^ Gleiberman, Owen (December 13, 2006). “Rocky Balboa (2006)”. Entertainment Weekly. http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,1569422,00.html. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  29. ^ Lemire, Christy (December 19, 2006). “”Rocky” offers self-parody”. China Daily. http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/entertainment/2006-12/19/content_762184.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  30. ^ Andrew, Colm (March 1, 2007). “Filmreview:Rocky’s Looking a Bit Punch Drunk”. Isle of Man Today. http://www.iomtoday.co.im/what-where-when/FILMREVIEWROCKY39S-LOOKING-A-BIT-PUNCH.2090755.jp. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  31. ^ Keenan, Ronan (January 24, 2007). “Is a Character Like Rocky Still Relevant to Boxing?”. BoxingScene.com. http://www.boxingscene.com/?m=show&id=7080.com. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  32. ^ Harry (December 21, 2006). “Sylvester Stallone public statement”. Ain’t It Cool News. http://www.aintitcool.com/node/31054. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  33. ^ “Weekend Box Office Results for December 22–24, 2007”. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/weekend/chart/?yr=2006&wknd=51&p=.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  34. ^ “Sylvester Stallone Movie Box Office Results”. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/people/chart/?view=Actor&id=sylvesterstallone.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  35. ^ “Sports – Boxing”. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/genres/chart/?id=boxing.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  36. ^ “Rocky Balboa ticket sales figures”. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=rocky6.htm. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  37. ^ “Rocky Balboa: The Best of Rocky”. Epinions.com. http://www.epinions.com/content_305002352260. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  38. ^ Wreckk. “Rocky Balboa Gearcritech Blu Ray Review”. Gearcritech.com. http://www.gearcritech.com/index.php/2007/03/16/review-rocky-balboa-blu-ray.php. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 
  39. ^ Luce, Patrick (February 15, 2007). “Sylvester Stallone’s Rocky Balboa comes to DVD, PSP and Blu-ray in March”. Monsters and Critics. http://www.monstersandcritics.com/dvd/news/article_1264409.php/Sylvester_Stallone%92s_Rocky_Balboa_comes_to_DVD_PSP_and_Blu-ray_in_March. Retrieved June 15, 2009. 

[edit] External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Rocky Balboa (film)
[show]v · d · eRocky
 
Films
Rocky · Rocky II · Rocky III · Rocky IV · Rocky V · Rocky Balboa
 
Characters
 
Video games
 
Related articles
[show]v · d · eWorks of Sylvester Stallone
 
Director
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rocky IV (1985) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Writer
The Lords of Flatbush (1974) · Rocky (1976) · F.I.S.T. (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · First Blood (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rhinestone (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Rocky IV (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Over the Top (1987) · Rambo III (1988) · Rocky V (1990) · Cliffhanger (1993) · Driven (2001) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Producer
Staying Alive (1983) · Heart of a Champion: The Ray Mancini Story (1985) · Driven (2001) · The Contender (2005–present)
 
Soundtrack
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rhinestone (1984)
 
Related articles
[show]v · d · eFilms scored by Bill Conti
 
1960s
Un sudario a la medida (1969) · Juliette de Sade (1969)
 
1970s
A Man, a Woman and a Bank (1979) · The Seduction of Joe Tynan (1979) · Rocky II (1979) · Goldengirl (1979) · Dreamer (1979) · Five Days from Home (1979) · Uncle Joe Shannon (1978) · Slow Dancing in the Big City (1978) · The Big Fix (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · F.I.S.T (1978) · An Unmarried Woman (1978) · Handle with Care (1977) · Rocky (1976)  · Next Stop, Greenwich Village (1976) · Pacific Challenge (1975) · Harry and Tonto (1974) · Blume in Love (1973) · Liquid Subway (1972)
 
1980s
Lock Up (1989) · The Karate Kid, Part III (1989) · Lean on Me (1989) · Cohen and Tate (1988) · Betrayed (1988) · Le grand bleu (1988) (US version) · A Night in the Life of Jimmy Reardon (1988) · For Keeps? (1988) · Broadcast News (1987) · Baby Boom (1987) · A Prayer for the Dying (1987) · Masters of the Universe (1987) · Happy New Year (1987) · I Love N.Y. (1987) · The Boss’ Wife (1986) · The Karate Kid, Part II (1986) · Big Trouble (1986) · Nomads (1986) · F/X (1986) · Niagara: Miracles, Myths and Magic (1986) · Beer (1985) · Gotcha! (1985) · Mass Appeal (1984) · The Coolangatta Gold (1984) · The Bear (1984) · The Karate Kid (1984) · Unfaithfully Yours (1984) · The Right Stuff (1983) · Bad Boys (1983) · That Championship Season (1982) · Split Image (1982) · Rocky III (1982) · I, the Jury (1982) · Neighbors (1981) · Carbon Copy (1981) · Victory (1981) · For Your Eyes Only (1981) · The Formula (1980) · Private Benjamin (1980) · Gloria (1980)
 
1990s
Inferno (1999/II) · The Thomas Crown Affair (1999) · The Real Macaw (1998) · Wrongfully Accused (1998) · Entertaining Angels: The Dorothy Day Story (1996) · Spy Hard (1996) · Bushwhacked (1995/I) · Napoleon (1995) · The Scout (1994) · The Next Karate Kid (1994) · 8 Seconds (1994) · Yellowstone (1994) · Rookie of the Year (1993) · Bound by Honor (1993) · The Adventures of Huck Finn (1993) · A Captive in the Land (1993) · By the Sword (1991) · Necessary Roughness (1991) · Year of the Gun (1991) · Rocky V (1990) · Backstreet Dreams (1990) · The Fourth War (1990)
 
2000s
Small Town Hero (2010) · The Perfect Game (2009) · Moonlight Blade (2009) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · The Gospel of Lou (2003) · 2 Birds with 1 Stallone (2002) · Avenging Angelo (2002) · G (2002) (music by) · Boys on the Run (2001) · Tortilla Soup (2001) · FX (2001)
Good article

 

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants
 

Actions
 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

 

 

Rocky V

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jump to: navigation, search

“Tommy Gunn” redirects here. For other uses, see Tommy Gunn (disambiguation).
Rocky V

Theatrical release poster
Directed by John G. Avildsen
Produced by Robert Chartoff
Irwin Winkler
Written by Sylvester Stallone
Starring Sylvester Stallone
Talia Shire
Burt Young
Sage Stallone
Burgess Meredith
Tommy Morrison
Tony Burton
Richard Gant
Music by Bill Conti
Songs:
Alan Menken
Cinematography Steven B. Poster
Editing by John G. Avildsen
Robert A. Ferretti
Michael N. Knue
Studio United Artists
Distributed by MGM/UA Distribution Co. (USA)
United International Pictures (Non-USA)
Release date(s) November 16, 1990
Running time 99 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Gross revenue $119,946,358

Rocky V is a 1990 American film that is the fifth film in the Rocky series. It stars Sylvester Stallone, Talia Shire, Stallone’s real life son Sage Stallone and real life boxer Tommy Morrison as boxer Tommy Gunn, a talented yet raw boxer.[1] Sage Stallone played Robert Balboa, whose relationship with his famous father is explored.

After Stallone directed the second through fourth films in the series, Rocky V saw the return of director John G. Avildsen, whose direction of the first film won him an Academy Award for Best Director.

This is the only Rocky film to receive a PG-13 rating by the MPAA; the other movies received PG ratings.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Plot summary

This article’s plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed. Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise. (January 2011)

Rocky V begins with Rocky and his trainer Tony “Duke” Evers in their dressing room after the Drago fight. Tony praises Rocky for his victory, but Rocky, seen to be in some form of physical discomfort, asks Tony to summon his wife, Adrian. His hands are shaking, and he cannot make them stop. In distress, he mistakenly calls out for “Mick,” the name of his deceased former trainer.

Rocky returns home from the Soviet Union and is greeted by his son, Robert. At the following press conference, a crooked promoter named George Washington Duke (a parody of boxing promoter Don King) tries to goad Rocky into fighting the new #1 contender to his championship, Union Cane, in Tokyo. Duke sees this as a great opportunity with Rocky in such a vulnerable state, but with Adrian insisting on her husband’s retirement, Rocky decides, at least for the time being, not to take the fight with Cane.

Rocky, Adrian, and Adrian’s brother Paulie return to their lavish Philadelphia home to find out that Paulie had Rocky unknowingly sign ‘power of attorney’ over to Balboa’s accountant, who had, in turn, squandered all of Rocky’s money on bad business deals and disappeared (it is also revealed the accountant had not paid Rocky’s income taxes in 6 years). As a result, Rocky immediately decides to take the fight against Cane to earn money. However, the years of fighting have taken a toll on him (especially the last one with Drago) and after a physical evaluation, it is determined that Rocky has suffered significant brain damage, and that he can no longer fight without further risking his health. Rocky is forced to vacate the championship (a brief scene shows Cane winning the vacant title) and move back into his old working-class Philadelphia neighborhood, where he and the family must try to start their lives over again. Now bankrupt, Rocky is humiliatingly forced to sell his house and watch all of his expensive belongings be auctioned off to the highest bidder. The only thing Rocky doesn’t lose is Mickey’s gym, which Mickey had willed to Rocky’s son, Robert (making it untouchable to the IRS). Rocky then begins training boxers at Mickey’s gym, Adrian gets her old job back at the pet store across the street and Paulie goes back to the meat packing plant.

Things start to look up for them when Rocky meets a hungry young fighter from Oklahoma named Thomas “Tommy” Gunn and takes him under his wing. Training the young fighter gives Rocky a sense of purpose, and he slowly helps Tommy fight his way up the ladder to become a top contender. He eventually becomes so distracted with Tommy’s training that he winds up neglecting his own son Robert, who becomes withdrawn and angry. He eventually falls in with the wrong crowd at school, and as a result he begins acting out at home.

Tommy’s impressive rise through the ranks catches the eye of Duke, who uses the promise of a title shot against Cane and Tommy’s own resentment at being compared to his trainer to lure him away from Rocky. Duke pulls up outside the Balboa house with Tommy in tow, who has now been deceived into thinking that Rocky doesn’t have his best interests in mind. When Rocky tries to convince his friend otherwise, an ungrateful Tommy drives off in a huff, leaving Rocky for good.

As he watches Tommy’s car speed off into the night, his head suddenly pounds with nightmarish flashbacks of his fight with Drago. When Adrian attempts to comfort him, Rocky’s frustrations finally boil over. He confesses that his life had meaning again when he was able to live vicariously through Tommy’s success. She reasons with him, telling him that Tommy never had his heart and spirit – that it was something he could never learn. When this realization hits him, an emotional Rocky embraces his wife and they begin to pick up the pieces. After finding Robert hanging out on a street corner, Rocky apologizes to his son, and they mend their broken relationship.

On January 1, 1990, Tommy wins the heavyweight title by knocking out Union Cane in the first round, but is booed by spectators throughout the fight and hounded by reporters afterward. They insist that Cane was nothing but a “paper champion,” because Cane didn’t win the title from Balboa. Therefore, the public would never consider Tommy the real champion unless he fights a worthy opponent. With Tommy enraged by the press’s reaction, Duke senses an opportunity and tells Tommy that he needs to fight Rocky man to man and settle once and for all who is the best.

Duke and Tommy show up at a local bar to goad Rocky into accepting a fight; Rocky initially declines but after Tommy hits Paulie, Rocky agrees, but instead challenges Tommy to a street fight on the spot. Despite Duke’s warnings to keep the fight in the ring, Tommy accepts the challenge.

Despite gaining the upper hand early in the fight, Rocky is eventually beaten down by Tommy and is seemingly out for the count. His head once again pounds with hellish visions of the fight with Drago and Mickey’s funeral. He then hears his old mentor’s voice urging him to get back in the fight, to go just “one more round.” Rocky gets back up after hearing Mickeys words “Get up you son of a bitch cause Mickey loves ya” and with his family and the entire neighborhood cheering him on, utilizes his vast street fighting knowledge to defeat Tommy, knocking him into the grill of a bus with his final blow. After the fight, Tommy gets arrested, and Duke commends Rocky and tries to appeal to him, but Rocky has heard enough. Duke threatens to sue if Rocky touches him, but after a brief hesitation, Rocky punches him in the gut anyway, knocking him onto the hood of a car. The crowd cheers as the bankrupt Rocky shrugs and quips, “Sue me for what?”

The next day, Rocky and Robert take a trip to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and Rocky gives his son Rocky Marciano’s cuff-link, given to him years ago as a gift from Mickey. The film ends with a shot of Rocky’s statue looking out over Philadelphia.

[edit] Soundtrack

This soundtrack is not an original motion picture score, but rather has music from and inspired by the film. This soundtrack features Joey B. Ellis, MC Hammer, 7A3, MC Tab, Rob Base, and Bill Conti. Most of the soundtrack is rap music, rather than Bill Conti tunes. Also, two of the scores from Rocky IV were featured in this film’s trailer, but were not present in the actual film. “Measure of a Man” was written by Alan Menken and performed by Elton John.

Like Rocky IV, a full version of “Gonna Fly Now” with lyrics is not heard in the film. However an instrumental horn version is played during the early scene where Rocky gets off the airplane, and at the end of the move after Rocky defeats Tommy, the first few seconds of the original version can be heard – though it never makes it to the lyrics.

[edit] Cast

The film contains cameos by several sportswriters and boxing analysts, most notably Al Bernstein, Stan Hochman and Al Meltzer. Sportscaster Stu Nahan makes his fifth appearance in the Rocky series, this time as a sports journalist.

Rocky’s priest friend Father Carmine (Paul Micale) makes his second of two appearances in the Rocky series, the first being in Rocky II.

The character “Tommy Gunn” was played by real-life boxer Tommy Morrison. Morrison’s nickname in boxing was “The Duke” similar to George Washington Duke, who becomes his manager in the movie. Morrison has claimed to be the grandnephew of John “The Duke” Wayne.

Michael Williams (III), who plays Union Cane, was also a real-life boxer. He and Morrison were to have an actual match about a month after Rocky V was released, but had to be canceled when Williams was hurt. The match was being hyped as “The Real Cane vs. Gunn Match.”

George Washington Duke (Richard Gant) is the main antagonist of the film, and based on Don King.

Tony Burton briefly reprises his role as Duke at the beginning of the film. However, during his scenes, Rocky refers to him as “Tony.” In the credits, Burton is credited as playing “Tony,” as opposed to “Duke” (perhaps to avoid confusion with the George Washington Duke character) Rocky V is the second time in the series to do so, with the first being Rocky II as Apollo asked “What are you afraid of, Tony?” Rocky Balboa names Burton’s character, “Duke Evers.” Most fans take this to imply that his name is Tony ‘Duke’ Evers.

Scenes with Mickey, played by Burgess Meredith, were trimmed in the final film when Rocky fights Tommy. Mickey appeared in ghost form on top of the railway bridge, giving words of encouragement. In the final film, this was made into flashbacks. The speech Mickey gives to Rocky in the flashback sequence is based on an interview with Cus D’Amato given in 1985, shortly after Mike Tyson‘s first professional bout.

Jodi Letizia, who played street kid Marie in the original Rocky (1976), was supposed to reprise her role here. Her character was shown to have ended up as Rocky predicted she would: a whore, but the scene ended up on the cutting room floor. The character would eventually reappear in Rocky Balboa (2006), as a bartender and confidante to the aging Rocky. Actress Geraldine Hughes took over the role.

Kevin Connolly, who gained success as Eric Murphy on HBO’s Entourage, was in his first acting role as neighborhood bully Chickie.

[edit] Production notes

Some of the fight sequences were filmed at The Blue Horizon in Philadelphia, a venue which was a mecca for boxing in the city during the 1970s.

The image of Gunn’s first professional fight, the pullback from the mural of Jesus over the boxing ring, mirrors the opening shot of the first Rocky movie. Adrian goes back to working at the pet shop she first worked at in the original Rocky.

The golden glove necklace featured so prominently in this film was first seen in Rocky II (worn by Apollo Creed), then again throughout Rocky III and Rocky IV . As a promotional gimmick, replicas of the necklace were distributed to moviegoers at the Hollywood premiere of Rocky V at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre.

The famous red, white and blue boxing trunks first worn by Apollo Creed in his fight with Rocky in the first film make their fifth and final appearance in this film. Rocky’s leather coat introduced in Rocky IV makes its second and final appearance in the franchise at the start of the movie.

The Ring Magazine belt in Rocky’s basement and the identical belt Morrison wins in the ring have changed slightly from the previous movies; they are missing the four side panels showing famous champions George Foreman, James J. Corbett, James J. Braddock, and Floyd Patterson.

According to Sylvester Stallone, pro wrestling legend Terry Funk helped choreograph much of the street fight between Rocky and Tommy Gunn. Sylvester Stallone originally intended for Rocky to die after defeating Tommy Gunn in their streetfight, however according to him, the director, and the studio had second thoughts and, eventually, Stallone rewrote the ending.

In the original script, Rocky is killed during the final fight with Tommy.[4] Through most of the filming and production, this was to be the outcome; it wasn’t until the film was nearing completion that Stallone decided to nix Rocky’s death and went with the current ending. Stallone said that he decided to change it because Rocky was supposed to be about perseverance and redemption, and having him die in a street brawl would be against the roots of the series.

[edit] Reception

Anticipated to be one of the big hits of the 1990 holiday season, Rocky V finished second in its opening weekend to Home Alone and never recovered.[5] The film earned $14 million on its opening weekend and $40 million in total U.S. box-office sales, about one-third of its predecessor’s take. Rocky V however made almost twice as much overseas and thereby a total of $119.9 million worldwide.

In addition to its disappointing numbers at the box office, this segment in the Rocky series left a sour taste in some fans’ mouths, as it left the hero back where he started, arguably with nothing to show for it. Rotten Tomatoes gives Rocky V a 24% “rotten” rating on its site. The film departed from the standard Rocky formula on display in the previous four films, and that made it extremely unpopular with the audiences that had been drawn to the previous sequels. Sylvester Stallone himself has gone on record in agreeing that he wasn’t satisfied with the finished product, saying “I wanted to finish the series on a high and emotional note, and Rocky V didn’t do that.” However, Sylvester Stallone was praised for his performance and the film received some positive feedback from some fans, while the Los Angeles Times regarded it as the best of the Rocky sequels.[6]

[edit] Final sequel: Rocky Balboa

Main article: Rocky Balboa (film)

As a result of, and in response to, Rocky V’s poor box office performance (and the general dissatisfaction with the end of the franchise), 16 years later Sylvester Stallone wrote, directed, and starred in Rocky Balboa, the sixth and final chapter to the saga. The sixth film was an attempt to redeem the character for a final chance to come back as a hero again, and do the story justice by bringing it full circle. It succeeded by grossing over $70 million at the U.S. box office as well, and $85 million abroad, and getting largely positive reviews from both fans and critics.

On July 8, 2010, in an interview with The Sun, Stallone was asked about the Rocky films. When he came to Rocky V, Stallone replied he made it out of greed, and reiterated that this was part of his motivation in making Rocky Balboa.[7]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Berger, Phil (November 15, 1989). “Film Flam for ‘Rocky'”. New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1989/11/15/sports/film-flam-for-rocky.html?scp=8&sq=Rocky%20V&st=cse. Retrieved 2010-08-12. 
  2. ^ “Stallone Jr. Hopes Playing Rocky Jr. Won’t Cramp His Lifestyle”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1990-11-24/entertainment/ca-4493_1_rocky-jr. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  3. ^ “Rocky V’ Has Drama Coaches in Its Corner : Film: Acting teachers are traditionally barred from movie sets. But for Stallone’s latest boxing epic, a Studio City couple was allowed to show newcomer Tommy Morrison the ropes, scene by scene and blow by blow.”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1990-11-16/entertainment/ca-4790_1_tommy-morrison. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  4. ^ “He could have been a contender”. Independent. http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/he-could-have-been-a-contender-1286809.html. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  5. ^ “‘Home’ KOs ‘Rocky V’ at Box Office”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1990-11-20/entertainment/ca-5106_1_weekend-box. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  6. ^ “MOVIE REVIEW : A Kinder, Gentler Rocky Balboa : Of Sylvester Stallone’s ‘Rocky’ sequels, No. 5 comes closest to some of the endearing qualities associated with the first.”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1990-11-16/entertainment/ca-4530_1_rocky-balboa. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  7. ^ “Sylvester Stallone gives his most candid interview ever”. The Sun. http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/showbiz/film/3045458/Sylvester-Stallone-gives-his-most-candid-interview-ever.html. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 

[edit] External links

[show]v · d · eRocky
 
Films
Rocky · Rocky II · Rocky III · Rocky IV · Rocky V · Rocky Balboa
 
Characters
 
Video games
 
Related articles
[show]v · d · eWorks of Sylvester Stallone
 
Director
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rocky IV (1985) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Writer
The Lords of Flatbush (1974) · Rocky (1976) · F.I.S.T. (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · First Blood (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rhinestone (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Rocky IV (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Over the Top (1987) · Rambo III (1988) · Rocky V (1990) · Cliffhanger (1993) · Driven (2001) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Producer
Staying Alive (1983) · Heart of a Champion: The Ray Mancini Story (1985) · Driven (2001) · The Contender (2005–present)
 
Soundtrack
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rhinestone (1984)
 
Related articles
[show]v · d · eFilms directed by John G. Avildsen
 
1960s
 
1970s
Guess What We Learned in School Today? (1970) · Joe (1970) · Cry Uncle! (1971) · Okay Bill (1972) · Save the Tiger (1973) · The Stoolie (1974) · Fore Play (1975) · W.W. and the Dixie Dancekings (1975) · Rocky (1976) · Slow Dancing in the Big City (1978)
 
1980s
The Formula (1980) · Neighbors (1981) · Traveling Hopefully (1982) · A Night in Heaven (1983) · The Karate Kid (1984) · The Karate Kid, Part II (1986) · Happy New Year (1987) · For Keeps (1988) · Lean on Me (1989) · The Karate Kid, Part III (1989)
 
1990s
Rocky V (1990) · The Power of One (1992) · 8 Seconds (1994) · Inferno (1999)

 

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants
 

Actions
 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

 

 

Rocky IV

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

 

Jump to: navigation, search

For the soundtrack to the movie, see Rocky IV (album).
Rocky IV

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Sylvester Stallone
Produced by Robert Chartoff
Irwin Winkler
Written by Sylvester Stallone
Starring Sylvester Stallone
Talia Shire
Burt Young
Carl Weathers
Tony Burton
Brigitte Nielsen
Dolph Lundgren
Music by Vince DiCola
Themes by
Bill Conti
Cinematography Bill Butler
Editing by John W. Wheeler
Don Zimmerman
Studio United Artists
Distributed by MGM/UA Entertainment Co.
Release date(s) November 27, 1985
Running time 90 min.
Country United States
Language English
Russian
Gross revenue $300,473,716

Rocky IV is a 1985 American film written by, directed by, and starring Sylvester Stallone. It is the fourth and most financially successful entry in the Rocky franchise.[1] In the film, Rocky Balboa plans to retire from boxing after regaining his title from Clubber Lang in Rocky III. An unknown amateur boxer from the Soviet Union, Ivan Drago (played by Dolph Lundgren), makes a bid to enter the U.S. boxing ranks.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Plot

This article’s plot summary may be too long or excessively detailed. Please help improve it by removing unnecessary details and making it more concise. (January 2011)

The story opens with a flashback of Rocky’s rematch against Clubber Lang at the end of the previous film, where Rocky defeated Lang to regain his title. Meanwhile, Ivan Drago (Dolph Lundgren), a highly intimidating 6 foot 4 inch, 261 pound Soviet boxer, arrives in America with his wife Ludmilla (Brigitte Nielsen), an Olympic gold medal swimmer, his manager, Nicolai Koloff (Michael Pataki), and a team of trainers headed by grizzled Russian coach Igor Rimsky (George Rogan), and the Cuban Manuel Vega (James “Cannonball” Green) to challenge the best U.S. fighters. His manager shows off the hi-tech equipment which aids in improving Drago’s performance, demonstrating Drago throwing punches at a machine that measures superhuman level, at 1850 psi. Motivated by patriotism and an innate desire to prove himself, Apollo is desperate to step back into the ring in an exhibition bout against Drago. A press conference is held to publicise the bout, which begins on affable terms (despite Apollo talking down to his opponent) but quickly changes when Apollo is accused of being a “has been” by Drago’s manager. Livid, Apollo loses his temper and tells Drago they’ll “finish this in the ring” before abruptly leaving the conference and an unfazed Drago.

Rocky has reservations, but trains Apollo for the fight which is supposed to be an exhibition match. It soon turns serious though, as Drago beats Apollo mercilessly. Apollo is in dire straits as the first round is over. Rocky and Duke plead with him to give up, but Apollo refuses to do so, and tells Rocky not to stop the fight no matter what. The second round starts just as the first ended. Rocky considers throwing in the towel but honors Apollo’s wish. It turns out to be a tragic decision, as Drago ultimately kills the former champion. Drago displays no sense of remorse, commenting: “If he dies… he dies.

Devastated by the death of Apollo Creed, Rocky decides to avenge his death by agreeing to relinquish his title and fight Drago in Russia on Christmas Day in an unsanctioned bout. Supported by Apollo’s manager Duke and his brother-in-law Paulie, he flies to Krasnoyarsk, Soviet Union, to train. To prepare for the fight, Drago uses very high tech equipment and (implied) use of anabolic steroids. Rocky, on the other hand uses a very basic, spartan approach. He throws logs, chops down trees, jogs in thick snow daily and climbs a mountain. When Adrian shows up unexpectedly to give him her support, Rocky’s training becomes more focused and energized than ever before. After intense preparation for both fighters, the two men finally meet in the ring.

Much like Apollo before, Drago is introduced with an elaborate, patriotic ceremony that puts the attending audience squarely on the side of Drago, leaving Rocky fiercely booed. In contrast to his fight with Apollo, Drago immediately goes on the offensive, repeatedly pounding Rocky and casually shrugging off his punches. After a pulverizing first round, Rocky comes back toward the end of the second and lands a strong shot that cuts Drago just below his left eye. While Drago is visibly shaken, Rocky is fired up, and defiantly stands up to Drago, pummeling him until, after the bell rings numerous times, Balboa is pulled off his opponent. Drago punches Rocky in revenge after putting him in a headlock, and Balboa lifts up and slams Drago to the ground, their managers splitting up the fight. The commentators say it’s like a street fight. While Duke and Paulie cheer Rocky for his heroism, they remind him that Drago is not a machine, but a man. Ironically, Drago comments that Rocky “is not human, he is like a piece of iron” with his own corner reprimanding him for being “weak” in comparison to the “small American.”

At this point, the fight becomes a fierce battle of wills between the two boxers. Drago, for the most part, holds the upper hand but his confidence drops due to Rocky’s seemingly limitless endurance, allowing Rocky to get in under his guard and deliver his own attack. By the fourteenth round, the previously hostile Soviet crowd has been won over by Rocky’s determination and is cheering him on. Koloff, fearing retribution from the Soviet General Secretary who resembles Mikhail Gorbachev, goes over to Drago and berates his performance, fiercely urging him to win and shoving his head. Drago’s response is to pick up Koloff by the throat with a single hand and throw him to the ground, and adamantly proclaim that he fights only for himself.

In the 15th (final) round of the fight, Rocky and Drago trade punch after punch with Rocky eventually knocking Drago out to the shock of the Soviet General Secretary. Victorious, Rocky is swarmed as the crowd floods the ring, lifting Rocky onto their shoulders and draping him in the American flag. A bloody and battered Rocky gives a victory speech, acknowledging the initial and mutual disdain between himself and the once hostile crowd as much as the disdain between Russians and Americans, how they’ve come to respect and admire each other during the course of the fight which he also says is better than war between their two countries, and how everybody can “change.” The General Secretary stands and passionately applauds Rocky and his aides follow suit. Rocky ends his speech by wishing his son a Merry Christmas, and throws his arms into the air in victory as the crowd applauds.

[edit] Cast

[edit] Production

Wyoming doubled for the frozen expanse of the Soviet Union. The small farm where Rocky lived and trained was in Jackson Hole, and the Grand Teton National Park was used for filming many of the outdoor sequences in Russia. The PNE Agrodome at Hastings Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, served as the location of Rocky’s Soviet bout.

Sylvester Stallone has stated that the original punching scenes filmed between him and Dolph Lundgren in the first portion of the fight are completely authentic. Stallone wanted to capture a realistic scene and Lundgren agreed that they would engage in legitimate sparring. One particularly forceful Lundgren punch to Stallone’s chest slammed his heart against his breastbone, causing the heart to swell and his breathing to become labored. Stallone, suffering from labored breathing and a blood pressure over 200, was flown from the set in Canada to St. John’s Hospital in Santa Monica and was forced into intensive care for eight days. Stallone later commented that he believed Lundgren had the athletic ability and talent to fight in the professional heavyweight division of boxing.[2]

Additionally, Stallone claimed that Lundgren nearly forced Carl Weathers to quit in the middle of filming the Apollo versus Drago exhibition fight. In one take for the Creed-Drago fight scene, Lundgren tossed Weathers into the corner of the boxing ring. Weathers shouted profanities at Lundgren while leaving the ring and announcing that he was quitting the movie and calling his agent. Only after Stallone forced the two actors to reconcile did the movie continue. This event caused a four day work stoppage while Weathers was talked back into the part and Lundgren had to be forced into toning down his aggressiveness.[2]

[edit] Casting

Sportscaster Stu Nahan makes his fourth appearance in the series as commentator for the Apollo/Drago fight. Warner Wolf replaces Bill Baldwin, who died following filming for Rocky III, as co-commentator. For the fight between Rocky and Drago, commentators Barry Tompkins and Al Bandiero portray themselves as USA Network broadcasters.

Apollo Creed’s wife Mary Anne (Sylvia Meals) made her third and final appearance in the series, the first being Rocky, although the character was mainly featured in “Rocky II”. Stallone’s then-wife, Brigitte Nielsen, appeared as Drago’s wife, Ludmilla.

The Soviet premier in the sky box during the Rocky-Drago match strongly resembles contemporary Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev. Actor David Lloyd Austin later played Gorbachev in The Naked Gun and played Russian characters in other films.

[edit] Music

Further information: Soundtrack

The soundtrack for the movie included “Living in America” by James Brown; the film’s music was composed by Vince DiCola (who also composed the soundtrack for The Transformers: The Movie that same year), and also included songs by John Cafferty (featuring Vince DiCola), Survivor, Kenny Loggins, and Robert Tepper. Go West wrote “One Way Street” for the movie by request of Sylvester Stallone. Europe’s hit “The Final Countdown“, written earlier in the decade by lead singer Joey Tempest, is often falsely stated as being featured in the film – no doubt due to its similarity to DiCola’s “Training Montage.” However, Europe’s track was not released as a single until late 1986.

DiCola replaced Bill Conti as the film’s composer. Conti, who was too busy with the first two Karate Kid films at the time, would return for Rocky V and Rocky Balboa. Rocky IV is the only film in the series not to feature original music by Conti. However, it does features arrangements of themes composed by Conti from the previous film in the series such as “The Final Bell”.

Conti’s famous piece of music from the Rocky series, “Gonna Fly Now”, does not appear at all in Rocky IV (the first time in the series this happened), though a few bars of it are incorporated into DiCola’s training montage instrumental.

According to singer Peter Cetera, he originally wrote his best-selling solo single “Glory of Love” as the end title for this film, but was passed over by United Artists, and instead used as the theme for The Karate Kid Part II.

[edit] Release

[edit] Box office performance

Rocky IV made $127.8 million in United States and Canada and $300 million worldwide, the most of any Rocky film. It was the highest-grossing sports film of all time until 2009’s The Blind Side which grossed $309 million (albeit, unadjusted for inflation).

[edit] Critical reception

Dolph Lundgren received acclaim for his performance as Ivan Drago. He won the Marshall Trophy for Best Actor at the Napierville Cinema Festival.[3] Rocky IV also won Germany’s Golden Screen Award. The film however received a 44% approval rating from Rotten Tomatoes.[4]

[edit] Analysis

Paulie’s Robot, an item that through the years has enjoyed a cult following of its own, was created by the International Robotics Inc. in New York City. The robot’s voice was the company’s CEO Robert Doornick. The robot is identified by robotic engineers as “SICO” and is/was a member of the Screen Actors Guild and toured with James Brown in the 1980s.[5] Rocky IV has been interpreted as a commentary on the power struggle between technology and humans, illustrated by both Paulie’s Robot and the technology utilized by Drago.[6] The infamous robot has also been characterized as a “pleasure-bot” to service the needs of Paulie was also performing the duty of watching Balboa’s son while he and Adrian are in Moscow.[7]
The film is recognized as being ahead of its time in its demonstration of groundbreaking high-tech sporting equipment, some of which was experimental and twenty years from public use.[8][9]

Rocky IV has been noted as a prime example of propaganda through film, with both the stark culture contrast of Apollo’s patriotic showing in Las Vegas and Drago’s cold, subdued performance in the USSR and the ubiquitous yet ineffective KGB officers stationed around Balboa’s cabin outside Krasnoyarsk.[10]

Rocky IV is one of the few sport movies that applies genuine sound effects from actual hits, bona fide training methods created by consultants and a bevy of special effects that in turn creates a film that has grown in popularity.[11] One prominent film critic has noted not only the increase in popularity of the film over the years, but that Stallone felt (much to his chagrin) his creative powers peaked at this chapter of the saga.[12] Stallone has also been quoted as saying the enormous financial success and fan following of Rocky IV once had him envisioning another Rocky movie devoted to Drago and his post-boxing life (although Stallone acknowledged he was in better shape, he was excommunicated from his country), with Balboa’s storyline parallel. However, he noted the damage both boxers sustained in the fight made them “incapable of reason” and thus planned Rocky V as a showcase of the results, though the film failed to resolve the saga.[13]

Scholars have examined Rocky IV and note the film’s strong, yet formulaic structure that emphasizes the power of the individual, particularly an idealistic American.[14] One author has noted the totalitarian regime Ivan Drago represents, his power demonstrated when he topples an arrogant opponent, and his subsequent defeat by the inventive, determined foe.[15]

At Comic-Con 2010, Sylvester Stallone and Dolph Lundgren accepted the Guinness World Record for the ‘Most Successful Sports Movie Franchise’ for Rocky.

[edit] References

  1. ^ “Rocky Movies”. Box Office Mojo. Box Office Mojo, LLC.. Archived from the original on 2007-06-07. http://web.archive.org/web/20070607221410/http://boxofficemojo.com/franchises/chart/?id=rocky.htm. Retrieved 2007-09-17. 
  2. ^ a b “Stallone Interview With Ain’t It Cool News”. AICN. http://www.aintitcool.com/node/30932. Retrieved 2007-01-25. 
  3. ^ Rocky IV: Award Wins and Nominations”. IMDb.com. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089927/awards. Retrieved September 3, 2010. 
  4. ^ http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/rocky_iv/
  5. ^ [1]
  6. ^ The Frankenstein myth in contemporary cinema. JH Rushing, TS Frentz – Critical Studies in Media, 1989
  7. ^ Can ‘The Fighter’ beat communism? PopWatch Rewind looks back at Rocky IV.‎ Entertainment WeeklyDarren Franich. Keith Staskiewicz.[2]
  8. ^ Von Hoff D: Rocky IV-Fight Medicine, Medical Grand Rounds presented at University of Texas Health Science Centre
  9. ^ Boxing and medicine R.C. Cantur – 1995 – Human Kinetics Publishers
  10. ^ Politics and Film: Propaganda and Its Influence During the Cold War. H Bullis – hti.math.uh.edu
  11. ^ It’s in the game’: sport fans, film and digital gaming. G Crawford – Sport in Society, 2008
  12. ^ “I could’ve been a contender”;: The boxing movie’s generic instability. T Williams – Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 2001
  13. ^ Acting His Age? The Resurrection of the 80s Action Heroes and their Aging Stars. P Gates. Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 2010. Routledge.
  14. ^ Rocky IV, Rambo II, and the Place of the Individual in Modern American Society. SC LeSueur, D Rehberger.Journal of American Culture Volume 11, Issue 2, pages 25–33, Summer 1988.
  15. ^ Rocky IV Meets La Grande Illusion: Pedagogy and Theory in Popular Culture Study.The Americanization of the global village: essays in comparative popular culture. Roger B. Rollin.Popular Press, 1989.

[edit] External links

[show]v · d · eRocky
 
Films
Rocky · Rocky II · Rocky III · Rocky IV · Rocky V · Rocky Balboa
 
Characters
 
Video games
 
Related articles
[show]v · d · eWorks of Sylvester Stallone
 
Director
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rocky IV (1985) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Writer
The Lords of Flatbush (1974) · Rocky (1976) · F.I.S.T. (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · First Blood (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rhinestone (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Rocky IV (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Over the Top (1987) · Rambo III (1988) · Rocky V (1990) · Cliffhanger (1993) · Driven (2001) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Producer
Staying Alive (1983) · Heart of a Champion: The Ray Mancini Story (1985) · Driven (2001) · The Contender (2005–present)
 
Soundtrack
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rhinestone (1984)
 
Related articles

 

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants
 

Actions
 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Rocky III is a 1982 American film that is the third installment in the Rocky film series. It is written and directed by and stars Sylvester Stallone as the title character, with Carl Weathers as former boxing rival Apollo Creed, Burgess Meredith as Rocky’s trainer Mickey, and Talia Shire as Rocky’s wife, Adrian.

Rocky’s opponent is James “Clubber” Lang, played by Mr. T. Lang is a younger and more aggressive boxer than Rocky. He is brash, arrogant, outspoken, and immensely strong. This role made Mr. T an icon, leading to him being one of the first elements outlined for The A-Team television series. The film also features professional wrestler Terry “Hulk Hogan” Bollea as the supporting character “Thunderlips”. This role brought Hogan to the attention of a widespread audience.

The film’s theme song “Eye of the Tiger“, was written by the group Survivor at the request of Stallone, and became a smash hit single, topping the US Billboard music charts and received an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Song.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Plot

In the three years since winning the world heavyweight title, Rocky has had a string of successful title defenses and seen his fame, wealth and celebrity increase. While unveiling a statue of himself at the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Rocky is publicly challenged by James “Clubber” Lang, a ferocious new boxer rapidly climbing the ranks. Lang accuses Rocky of intentionally accepting challenges from lesser opponents, and after insulting Rocky’s wife, Adrian, his challenge is accepted.

Rocky’s trainer, Mickey, intitially wants no part of it and admits to the champion that Lang was right, and that he had handpicked Rocky’s opponents to protect him and to ensure Rocky remained successful and healthy. He also informs Rocky that Lang is young and hungry and that Rocky has no chance of beating him, as he has not retained his edge as a fighter. Rocky manages to convince Mickey to train him regardless, but his Las Vegas-style training camp is filled with distractions and Rocky clearly does not take the challenge seriously.

Lang and Rocky meet at Philadelphia’s Spectrum. During a melee before the fight, Mickey is shoved out of the way by Lang and suffers a heart attack. A now distraught Rocky wants to call the fight off, but Mickey angrily urges him on while he stays in the dressing room. By the time of the fight, Rocky is both enraged and severely distracted by his mentor’s condition. The fight begins with Rocky pounding Lang with several huge blows, going for an early knockout, but the stronger and better prepared Lang is unfazed and quickly takes charge, dominating Rocky and knocking him out with a haymaker in the second round. Beaten, Rocky makes his way back to the dressing room and to the dying Mickey. Kneeling at his side, Rocky speaks to his friend, telling him that the fight ended in the second round by a knockout, which Mickey misinterprets as a win for Rocky, shortly before dying.

Stopping by Mickey’s closed gym, Rocky is confronted by his former nemesis, Apollo Creed, who offers to help train him for a rematch with Lang. At first, Rocky is too demoralized to put forth his best efforts, which frustrates Apollo, but pulls himself together after Adrian helps him come to terms with Mickey’s death.

The rematch is held at Madison Square Garden in New York City. At the start of the fight, Rocky sprints from his corner, fighting with a level of skill and spirit that no one, including Lang, expected. As a result Rocky completely dominates the first round, demonstrating his new-found speed. After the bell, Lang is in a fit of rage over what has just happened and has to be restrained by his trainers. In the second round, Lang gains the upper hand, and Rocky adopts an entirely different strategy that bewilders Apollo by intentionally taking a beating from Lang, and even gets knocked down at one point but manages to get up before he is counted out whilst taunting Lang for being unable to knock him out.

In the third round, Lang, who is used to winning fights swiftly with knockouts in the early rounds, becomes increasingly angry and quickly exhausts his energy trying to finish Rocky off with repeated knockout blows, most of which miss the newly-agile Rocky entirely. Rocky taunts the champion in order to psyche him out, and the hot-tempered Lang is infuriated. He attacks even harder, walking right into Rocky’s trap. The tide turns, and Rocky is able to overpower the winded and outfoxed Lang, landing blow after blow and dodging attempted punches before knocking him out and re-gaining the heavyweight championship of the world.

[edit] Cast

In addition to the main cast several others had cameo appearances. Bill Baldwin and Stu Nahan returned as the fight commentators for the two Rocky-Lang fights. Veteran ring announcer Jimmy Lennon was the ring announcer for the first Lang fight, while boxing judge Marty Denkin was the referee. Lou Filippo returned for his third appearance as a referee during the second Lang fight. Dennis James appeared as the announcer for the Rocky-Thunderlips match, while LeRoy Neiman was the guest ring announcer.

[edit] Soundtrack

Rocky III
Soundtrack album by Bill Conti
Released 1982
Length 32:00
Label EMI Music
Professional reviews
  1. “Eye of the Tiger” (by Survivor) 3:53
  2. “Take You Back (Tough Gym)” 1:48
  3. “Pushin'” 3:10
  4. “Decision” 3:20
  5. “Mickey” 4:42
  6. “Take You Back” 3:37
  7. “Reflections” 2:05
  8. “Gonna Fly Now” 2:52
  9. “Adrian” 1:42
  10. “Conquest” 4:40
  • Frank Stallone – vocals (2, 3, 6)
  • Ray Pizzi – sax (3)
  • Jerry Hey – trumpet (3)
  • Vincent DeRosa – French horn (5)
  • Mike Lang – piano (5)
  • DeEtta Little, Nelson Pigford – vocals (8)

The version of “Eye of the Tiger” that appears in the film is actually a demo – the “finished” version is what appears on the soundtrack. Also missing from the soundtrack is the instrumental version of the song played when Rocky is training in Apollo’s old gym.

[edit] Production

Wiki letter w cropped.svg This section requires expansion.

In preparation for film, Stallone claims to have got his body fat percentage down to his all time low of 2.8% and weighed 155 lbs.[1]

[edit] Bronze statue

Question book-new.svg
This section needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (January 2011)

A bronze statue of Rocky, called “ROCKY”, was commissioned by Sylvester Stallone and created by A. Thomas Schomberg in 1981. Three statues were created, and one was placed on the top of the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the filming of Rocky III. After filming was complete, a furious debate erupted in Philadelphia between the Art Museum and the City’s Art Commission over the meaning of “art“. Claiming the statue was not “art” but rather a “movie prop” the city considered various alternate locations and settled upon the front of the Wachovia Spectrum in South Philadelphia. It was later returned to the Art Museum where it was used in the filming of Rocky V, as well as Mannequin and Philadelphia. Afterward, it was again moved to the front of the Spectrum. The statue was returned to the museum’s steps on September 8, 2006.

In Rocky Balboa, when Rocky told Paulie that he is going to make a comeback, Paulie suggested “you mad because they took down your statue?” which Rocky denied.

The third of the three statues was listed on eBay in early 2005, with a starting bid of US$5,000,000. It was being auctioned to raise funds for the International Institute for Sport and Olympic History. It failed to sell and was listed again for US$3 million; after receiving only one bid, which turned out to be fraudulent, it has been re-listed several times for US$1 million.[2] The statues weigh 800 pounds each and stand about 8’6″ tall.

[edit] Release

[edit] Critical reception

Rocky III holds a 60% approval rating on the review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes.[3]

[edit] Box office performance

Rocky III was an enormous box office success. It surpassed the domestic gross of its predecessor Rocky II,[4] and became the fifth highest grossing film of 1982.[5] Roger Ebert and Gene Siskel attributed the film’s success to the positive reaction from critics and audiences towards Rocky II and the production team’s “quality control” of that film. Siskel stated “if you want a hugely successful series, make sure that second one is a winner”.[6] The film grossed $16,015,408 in its opening weekend[7] and $125,049,125 domestically during its theatrical run.[8]

[edit] Award wins and nominations

Rocky III was nominated for both the Award of the Japanese Academy for Best Foreign Language Film and Best Motion Picture at the Image Awards. The film’s theme song Eye of the Tiger was nominated for Best Original Song at the Academy Awards, the BAFTA Film Awards and the Golden Globes.[9]

[edit] References

  1. ^ Muscle & Fitness, Sept, 2004 by Michael Berg
  2. ^ International Institute for Sport and Olympic History – A Non-profit, Educational Corporation under 501c3, IISOH
  3. ^ Rocky III Movie Reviews, Pictures”. Rotten Tomatoes. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/rocky_iii/. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  4. ^ “Box Office Information for Rocky II. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=rocky2.htm. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  5. ^ “1982 Domestic Grosses”. Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=1982&view=releasedate&view2=domestic&sort=gross&order=DESC&&p=.htm. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  6. ^ Siskel & EbertAt the Movies: The Secret of Star Wars on YouTube. Retrieved June 11, 2010.
  7. ^ “Box Office and Business Information for Rocky III. IMDb.com. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0084602/business. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  8. ^ “Box Office Information for Rocky III. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=rocky3.htm. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 
  9. ^ Rocky III: Award Wins and Nominations”. IMDb.com. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0084602/awards. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 

[edit] External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Rocky III
[show]v · d · eRocky
 
Films
Rocky · Rocky II · Rocky III · Rocky IV · Rocky V · Rocky Balboa
 
Characters
 
Video games
 
Related articles
[show]v · d · eWorks of Sylvester Stallone
 
Director
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rocky IV (1985) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Writer
The Lords of Flatbush (1974) · Rocky (1976) · F.I.S.T. (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · First Blood (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rhinestone (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Rocky IV (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Over the Top (1987) · Rambo III (1988) · Rocky V (1990) · Cliffhanger (1993) · Driven (2001) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010)
 
Producer
Staying Alive (1983) · Heart of a Champion: The Ray Mancini Story (1985) · Driven (2001) · The Contender (2005–present)
 
Soundtrack
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rhinestone (1984)
 
Related articles
 

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants
 

Actions
 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Charles Sisto Malatesta May 24, 2011

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

// <![CDATA[
/*

John Rambo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the fictional Vietnam War veteran. For the real-life politician, see John Rambo (politician). For the real-life athlete, see John Rambo (athlete). For the film sometimes called John Rambo, see Rambo (film).

This article describes a work or element of fiction in a primarily in-universe style. Please help rewrite it to explain the fiction more clearly and provide non-fictional perspective. (January 2011)

Question book-new.svg

This article needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2010)

John Rambo
JohnRambo2008.jpg
John Rambo in 2008
First appearance First Blood
Last appearance Rambo
Created by David Morrell
Portrayed by Sylvester Stallone[1]
Information
Aliases Raven, Lone Wolf (field names)
Gender Male
Occupation Soldier, mercenary
Family R. Rambo (father), Marie Drago (mother) Col. Trautman (friend)
Nationality United States American

John J. Rambo is an iconic fictional character and the basis of the Rambo saga.[2] He first appeared in the 1972 novel First Blood by David Morrell, but later became more famous in the film series, played by Sylvester Stallone. The character John Rambo was considered a possible candidate for the American Film Institute‘s list 100 Years…100 Heroes and Villains.[3]

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Biography

[edit] Early life

John J. Rambo, was born on July 6, 1947 in Bowie, Arizona to a Native American (Navajo) father (R. Rambo according to the last film) and an Italian American mother (Marie Drago). However, in Rambo: First Blood Part II, Marshall Murdock states that Rambo is of Native American Indian/German descent. Rambo graduated from Rangeford High School, and then was drafted into the United States Army at the age of 17 on June 8, 1964. He was deployed to South Vietnam in September 1966. He returned to the U.S. in 1967 and began training in the Special Forces (Green Berets) at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. In late 1969, Rambo was re-deployed to Vietnam. In November 1971, he was captured by North Vietnamese forces near the Chinese-Vietnamese border and held at a POW camp, where he and other American POWs were repeatedly tortured. Rambo escaped captivity in May 1972, but was then re-deployed. At some point in his military career he also apparently received training in flying helicopters.

Upon his return to the U.S., Rambo discovered that many American civilians hated the returning soldiers from Vietnam, and he himself along with other returning soldiers were subject to humiliation and embarrassment by anti-war “hippies” who throw garbage at them, call them “baby killers”, and exclude them from society. His experiences in Vietnam and back home resulted in an extreme case of post-traumatic stress disorder of a sort that does not seem to have ever manifested in reality. At the same time, inner questions of self identity and reflectiveness cause Rambo to lash out at society rather than handling difficult situations in a “civilized” manner. This is where First Blood picks up from.

[edit] First Blood

[edit] Novel

The original novel is similar to its film adaptation, but contains several notable differences.

In the novel, Rambo is hitch hiking in Madison, Kentucky. He is picked up by Sheriff Teasle and dropped off at the city limits. Repeatedly coming back, Teasle arrests him and drives him to the station. He is charged with vagrancy and resisting arrest and is sentenced to 35 days in jail. Being trapped inside the cold, wet, small cells gives Rambo a flashback of his days as a POW in Vietnam, and he fights off the cops as they attempt to cut his hair and shave him, beating one man and slashing another with the straight razor. He flees, steals a motorcycle, and hides in the nearby mountains. He becomes the focus of a manhunt that results in the deaths of many police officers and National Guardsmen.

In a climactic ending in the town where his conflict with Teasle began, Rambo is finally hunted down by Special Forces Colonel Trautman and Teasle. Teasle, using his local knowledge, manages to surprise Rambo and shoots him in the chest, but is himself wounded in the stomach by a return shot. He then tries to pursue Rambo as he makes a final attempt to escape back out of the town. Both men are essentially dying by this point, but are driven by pride and a desire to justify their actions. Rambo, having found a spot he feels comfortable in, prepares to commit suicide by detonating a stick of dynamite against his body; however, he then sees Teasle following his trail and decides that it would be more honourable to continue fighting and be killed by Teasle’s return fire.

Rambo fires at Teasle and, to his surprise and disappointment, hits him. For a moment he reflects on how he had missed his chance of a decent death, because he is now too weak to light the dynamite, but then suddenly feels the explosion he had expected – but in the head, not the stomach where the dynamite was placed. Rambo dies satisfied that he has come to a fitting end. Trautman returns to the dying Teasle and tells him that he has killed Rambo with his shotgun.

[edit] Film

John Rambo in 1982, after returning to civilian life.

The film First Blood takes place in December 1982, and begins with John Rambo (now a homeless, out-of-work drifter) searching for Delmore Barry, an old friend with whom he served in Vietnam. He goes to Barry’s home but is told by his mother that he died from cancer due to Agent Orange exposure. This means that Rambo is now the last surviving member of his Special Forces unit. He then travels to the small town of Hope, Washington, where he is quickly spotted by the town’s overzealous and paranoid sheriff, Will Teasle, due to his long hair, military-style coat and all-around scruffy appearance. Teasle soon picks him up and drives him to the edge of town, while stressing his dislike of drifters and “trouble makers.” Rambo begins heading back into town immediately after being dropped off, and Teasle then arrests him when Rambo did not comply and takes him to the local police station.

When searching Rambo, Teasle discovers a large Survival knife on Rambo’s belt. At the station, the Deputy Sheriff, Art Galt, harasses and beats Rambo, who begins having flashbacks to the war, where he was a POW. When officers attempt to dry shave him, Rambo finally snaps and fights his way out of the station, retrieving his knife. Outside, he hijacks a motorcycle from a man driving past and flees into the nearby mountains while being pursued by Teasle in his police car. Teasle crashes his car, and Rambo escapes. Teasle calls more officers and a helicopter in for assistance, while Rambo abandons his motorcycle and makes his way into the deep terrain on foot. While climbing down a steep cliff face, he is spotted by the search helicopter with Galt in the passenger’s seat. The helicopter gets caught in a thermal draft, and has trouble maintaining control to give Galt a clear shot. Galt fires at him a number of times with his rifle, forcing Rambo to jump off the cliff-side, or be shot. Rambo breaks his fall by landing in a tree, but his arm is wounded in the process. Galt continues to fire upon the injured Rambo on the ground, and before Galt can shoot Rambo, he throws and hits the helicopter windshield with a rock he grabbed. The pilot loses control, swerving wildly, and Galt is thrown to his death. Rambo grabs Galt’s gun, and runs behind some cover. Rambo opens up the butt of his knife, taking out a hook and thread. He then stitches up the wound on his arm, without anesthetic. Rambo comes out from cover, and confronts the men on the cliff. Rambo tells them, “There’s one man dead! It was not my fault!”. Teasle tells Rambo not to move or they will shoot. Rambo says he doesn’t want anymore trouble, and begins to back away. The men open fire, and appear to graze Rambo in the face. Rambo then runs into the woods, Teasle and his deputies in pursuit. The men catch up to Rambo, and they release the tracking dogs.

Rambo shoots one with his last bullet, and kills the other with his bare hands. The men begin to flank out and pursue Rambo, but Rambo easily disables them using guerrilla tactics. Rambo severely wounds each man, but doesn’t kill any of them. Rambo jumps out of the brush and grabs Teasle, putting his knife to his throat. He tells him “In town you’re the law, out here its me.” He tells Teasle to “Let it go” and give up his pursuit. Teasle doesn’t, and the State Police and National Guard are called in to assist in the hunt. Colonel Sam Trautman soon arrives, taking credit for training Rambo. He is surprised to find any of the deputies still alive, and warns that it would be safer to let Rambo go and find him after the situation has calmed down. Teasle refuses to give in. Teasle asks Trautman to try and contact Rambo on the radio he took to get his position. Trautman gets Rambo to respond on the radio, calling out his Vietnam company. Rambo tells him that he didn’t draw First Blood, and that he can’t turn himself in. Rambo is eventually cornered by the National Guard in a mine entrance. Teasle gets word they have cornered him, and gives an order not to fire. The inexperienced guardsmen ignore this order, and fire a rocket launcher at him. The blast collapsed the mine entrance, trapping him inside. The men assume Rambo is dead, and unknowable to his pursuers, Rambo has escaped into the tunnels of the mine.

Rambo eventually finds an old exit vent, near a main road where the troops are clearing out from. Rambo hijacks a passing Army truck and returns to town, crashing it into a gas station. He blocks the highway to anyone in pursuit, by igniting the spilled fuel.Now heavily armed with an M60, Rambo destroys transformers knocking out the power to the town. Rambo spots Teasle on the station roof, destroys a few other businesses and a gun shop before making his way to the police station. Rambo destroys the police station before making his way inside. Teasle spots Rambo and fires at him, but misses. Rambo shoots back at Teasle, injuring him. Teasle falls through the roof onto the floor. Rambo steps over him, prepared to kill him. Before Rambo can shoot Teasle, Colonel Trautman appears and tells him that there is no hope of escaping alive. Rambo, now surrounded by the police, rages about the horrors of war, and the difficulties he has faced adapting to civilian life. He weeps as he recounts a particularly gruesome story about witnessing his friend dying. He tells Trautman how they were in a bar, talking about his friend’s Chevy and driving to Las Vegas in it, when a boy came in with a booby-trapped shoeshine box. Rambo went to buy a drink, when the box explodes, tearing his lower body off. Rambo then turns himself in to Trautman, and is arrested.

  • In an alternative ending, where Rambo wants to die. He gives a gun to Trautman, and tells him to kill him. Trautman doesn’t do anything. Rambo pushes the trigger while it’s in Trautman’s hand, and dies. Trautman then is mad and walks away.

[edit] Rambo: First Blood Part II

After the incident in Washington, John Rambo was sent to a labour camp prison. At the beginning of Rambo: First Blood Part II (set in 1985), he was visited by Colonel Samuel Trautman who offered him the chance to be released from prison if he went to Vietnam to search for American POWs. He accepts and later meets with Marshall Murdock, an American bureaucrat who is in charge of the operation. He tells Rambo that he is only to photograph the POWs and not to rescue them, nor is he to engage any enemy soldiers. Rambo reluctantly agrees and he is then told that an agent of the American government will be there to receive him in the jungles of Vietnam.

He is then parachuted into the Vietnamese jungles. However, while parachuting, he loses some of his equipment and is left with only his knives, his bow, and arrows. On the ground, he met with Co Bau, a local woman working with the Americans. She takes him to a POW camp where he is able to rescue a captive. However, escaping requires him to kill a number of enemy soldiers with his bow. The trio then escape by boat but are attacked by a gunboat.

Rambo destroys the gunboat with a rocket-launcher. When Rambo calls for extraction, he is denied as Murdock fears what will happen to him and his party if the American public come to know about it. Meanwhile Co enters the camp under the disguise of a prostitute and comes to the hut in which Rambo is held captive. Rambo agrees to Podovsky’s condition, but instead threatens Murdock on the radio that he is coming to get him, then escapes from captivity into a nearby jungle with Co’s help. They hide in the jungle and Co aids Rambo’s wounds. She then asks him if he will take her with him to America, he agrees and he kisses her. But they are attacked by some Vietnamese soldiers and Co is shot down. Enraged and distraught by Co’s death, he kills them all (except for their commander, who escapes, but is later killed by one of Rambo’s exploding arrows) and then buries Co’s body in the jungle.

After the violence at the camp and on the river, Soviet and Vietnamese troops were scrambled to search and kill Rambo. While hunting for Rambo in a forest, Rambo kills a number of Soviet and Vietnamese soldiers using guerilla tatics. Vietnamese soldiers continue to chase Rambo into and through a village. In the village, there’s a patch of tall grass where Rambo sets a booby-trap explosion that ignites a fire, burning many of the Vietnamese soldiers.

While still running away from the soldiers, a Soviet attack helicopter finds Rambo and drops a keg of explosives down on him. Rambo dives off a cliff into a river as the keg expodes. The Soviet helicopter pursues him, shooting bullets into the water. As the helicopter gets closer to the water while shooting bullets, Rambo jumps up from under the water, yanks the gunman into the water and climbs into the helicopter where he confronts the Soviet soldier who tortured him. As they wrestle inside the helicopter, the helicopter flys away and Rambo throws the Soviet soldier out of the helicopter. As Rambo approaches the pilot, the pilot also jumps out of the helicopter. Rambo gains control of the helicopter and flies it back to the POW camp to rescue the remaining POW’s. He kills the remaining guards and picks up the captives in the chopper. Whilst flying to Thailand, another Soviet attack helicopter tails Rambo’s. After its pilot loses Rambo’s chopper in a haze of smoke from firing at it, it finds Rambo’s vehicle smoking in a river. As the Russian chopper flies in low to investigate and finish off the bird once and for all, Rambo—who appears to be knocked unconscious—suddenly sits up, shoulder-firing rocket in hand, fires through the windshield and finishes off his would-be assailant once and for all.

Rambo then returns to the base and, using the M60E3 machine gun from the helicopter, destroys Murdock’s command center. He then unsheathes his knife and threatens Murdock to find and rescue the remaining American POWs in Vietnam, snarling almost under his breath, “You know there’s more men out there…you know where they are. Find ’em…or I’ll find YOU.” Trautman then comforts Rambo and tries to pacify him. Rambo, however, gets angry and says that he only wants his country to love its soldiers as much as its soldiers love it. Rambo then moves towards an unknown destination. Trautman asks him, “How will you live, John?” To this, Rambo replies, “Day by day.” The film ends as Rambo walks off into the distance while his mentor watches him. Becaue of his actions of saving the POWs, Rambo is granted a presidential pardon and decides to live in Thailand.

[edit] Rambo III

The film opens with Colonel Samuel Trautman returning to Thailand to once again enlist the help of Rambo. After witnessing Rambo’s victory in a stick-fighting match, Trautman visits the construction site of the temple Rambo is helping to build and asks Rambo to join him on a mission to Afghanistan. The mission is meant to supply weapons, including FIM-92 Stinger missiles, to Afghan rebels, the Mujahideen, who are fighting the Soviets in the Soviet-Afghan War. Despite showing him photos of civilians suffering under Soviet military intervention, Rambo refuses and Trautman chooses to go on his own.

While in Afghanistan, Trautman’s troops are ambushed by Soviet troops while passing through the mountains at night. Trautman is imprisoned in a Soviet base and coerced for information by Colonel Zaysen and his henchman Kourov. Rambo learns of the incident from embassy field officer Robert Griggs and convinces Griggs to take him through an unofficial operation, despite Grigg’s warning that the U.S. government will deny any knowledge of his actions if killed or caught. Rambo immediately flies to Pakistan where he meets up with Mousa, a weapons supplier who agrees to take him to a village deep in the Afghan desert, close to the Soviet base where Trautman is kept. The Mujahideen in the village are already hesitant to help Rambo in the first place, but are definitely convinced not to help him when their village is attacked by Soviet helicopters after one of Mousa’s shop assistants has informed the Soviets of Rambo’s presence. Aided only by Mousa and a young boy named Hamid, Rambo makes his way to the Soviet base and starts his attempts to free Trautman. The first attempt is unsuccessful and results not only in Hamid getting shot in the leg, but also in Rambo himself getting splinters in the side. After escaping from the base, Rambo tends to Hamid’s wounds and sends him and Mousa away to safety.

The next day, Rambo returns to the base once again, just in time to rescue Trautman from being tortured with a blow-torch. After rescuing several other prisoners, Rambo steals a helicopter and escapes from the base. However, the helicopter soon crashes and Rambo and Trautman are forced to continue on foot. After a confrontation in a cave, where Rambo and Trautman eliminate several Soviet Spetsnaz commandos including Kourov, they are confronted by an entire army of Soviet tanks, headed by Zaysen. Just as they are about to be overwhelmed by the might of the Red Army, the Mujahideen warriors, together with Mousa and Hamid, ride onto the battlefield by the hundreds in a cavalry charge, overwhelming the Communists. In the ensuing battle, in which both Trautman and John are wounded, Rambo manages to kill Zaysen by driving a tank (somehow doing the work of a four man crew all by himself, by also loading and firing the main gun) into the Russian’s helicopter. Rambo survives the explosion and gets out of the tank. At the end of the battle Rambo and Trautman say goodbye to their Mujahideen friends and leave Afghanistan to go home.

[edit] Rambo

The film opens with newsreels of the crisis in Burma. Burma (now known as Myanmar) is under the iron fist rule of Than Shwe and takes harsher stances against the nation’s pro-democracy movement. Rebels are thrown into a mine-infested marsh and then gunned down by the Tatmadaw, while the Burmese military officer Major Pa Tee Tint gazes grimly at the scene.

Former U.S. soldier John Rambo is still living in Thailand and resides in a village near the Burmese border. He makes a living capturing snakes and selling them in a nearby village. He also transports roamers in his boat. A missionary, Michael Burnett, asks Rambo to take him and his associates up the Salween River to Burma on a humanitarian mission to give aid to Karen tribespeople. Rambo refuses but is convinced by Sarah Miller to take them.

The boat is stopped by Burmese pirates who demand Sarah, in exchange for passage. After negotiations fail, Rambo kills them all. Although his actions save the missionaries, it greatly disturbs them. Upon arrival, Michael says that they will travel overland and will not need Rambo’s help for the return trip. The mission goes well until the Tatmadaw, led by Major Tint, attack. They kill most of the villagers and two missionaries and kidnap the rest, including Michael and Sarah. When the missionaries fail to come back after ten days, their pastor comes to ask Rambo’s help in guiding hired mercenaries to the village where the missionaries were last seen.

Rambo agrees to transport the soldiers. At their destination, Rambo tries to accompany the mercenaries with a black-wrapped package in hand, but their leader, described as a former “old school” and egotistical S.A.S. trooper, refuses. After arriving at the destroyed village with their guide, Karen, they’re forced to hide when some Tatmadaw arrive by truck and force their villager prisoners to run a gauntlet of hidden land mines thrown into the village rice paddies. The mercenary leader will not order a rescue as he is concerned that the missing Tatmadaw will put the rest on alert, however Rambo shows up with what is revealed to be his bow and shoots down the Tatmadaw. Rambo confronts the leader when the man threatens him, and with his arrow pointed at his eye socket, Rambo tells him and the others that soldiering is what they are and do, and they can either live for nothing or die for something; when Rambo stands down and tells the others to come, they follow without question with the leader in tow. They plan to save the hostages at a P.O.W. camp. Rambo helps Sarah and the others to escape. The Tatmadaw unit finds the hostages missing and organizes a massive manhunt. Everyone except for Rambo, Sarah, and the mercenary sniper “School Boy” is captured. Just as the group is to be executed, Rambo seizes a truck-mounted .50-caliber machine gun and engages the Burmese army, giving an opening for School Boy to shoot down the Tatmadaw near the others and provide them also with weapons. Karen rebels join the fight to help Rambo and the mercenaries win. Major Tint attempts to get away, but is personally disemboweled by Rambo.

Encouraged by Sarah’s words, Rambo returns to the United States. A silent last scene shows him walking along a rural highway, past a horse farm and a rusted mailbox bearing the name “R. Rambo.” When previously asked if he had any living family, Rambo said his father might still be alive. He then makes his way down the gravel driveway as the credits roll.

[edit] Awards

In First Blood is mentioned:

Per dialogue in Rambo: First Blood Part II, during his Vietnam era service, Rambo was awarded:

In “Rambo Prepares Knife” deleted scene from Rambo III, Rambo’s “Class A” uniform can clearly be seen (although his rank can not be seen) in his footlocker with the following 13 ribbons:

In a measure of discontinuity within the storyline, Rambo’s Silver Stars and Distinguished Service Cross were missing from his ribbon rack as well as the National Defense Medal and the Good Conduct Medal, both of which he would have been awarded.

Various special duty badges can also be seen on Rambo’s “Class A” uniform, including:

Additionally, in this same scene, Rambo’s Social Security Number is revealed: 936-01-1758. However, the Social Security Administration does not issue a SSN with the prefix 936. Citizens in Arizona, Rambo’s home state, are issued SSNs with the prefixes 526-527, 600-601, and 764-765. This was probably done to avoid the chances that Rambo’s fictional SSN would match that of a real living person.

[edit] Origins

David Morrell says that in choosing the name Rambo he was inspired by “the sound of force” in the name of Rambo apples, which he encountered in Pennsylvania. Peter Gunnarsson Rambo sailed from Sweden to New Sweden (SE Pennsylvania/Southern NJ/Northern Delaware) in the 1640s, and soon the name would flourish in New Sweden. Today, many of his descendants can still be found in this region of the US. Morrell felt that its pronunciation was similar to the surname of Arthur Rimbaud, the title of whose most famous work A Season in Hell, seemed to him “an apt metaphor for the prisoner-of-war experiences that I imagined Rambo suffering”.[4] Furthermore, an Arthur J. Rambo was an actual U.S. soldier in Vietnam, but he never returned. His name can be seen on the Vietnam War Memorial wall in Washington, DC. By sheer coincidence, the Japanese word “rambō” (乱暴) means “violent” or “rough.”

[edit] Portrayals

In all four films, Rambo is portrayed by Sylvester Stallone, and he was set to reprise the role in a fifth film until this project was cancelled. In the animated TV series, the character is voiced by Neil Ross.

[edit] Appearances

[edit] Novels/Novelizations

[edit] Films

[edit] Video games

[edit] Television series

  • Rambo and the Forces of Freedom, 1986

[edit] Comics

[edit] See Also

[edit] References

[edit] External links

[hide]v·d·eRamboVideo games

Other

Characters

 
 
 
David Morrell • Jimmy Lile • Gil Hibben • Rambo and the Forces of Freedom • The Intruder • Son of Rambow
 
John Rambo • Sam Trautman

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants

Actions

// // // //

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

// <![CDATA[
/*

Rambo III

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This article is about the film. For the video game, see Rambo III (video game).
Rambo III

Rambo III movie poster
Directed by Peter MacDonald
Produced by Buzz Feitshans
Mario Kassar
Andrew G. Vajna
Screenplay by Sylvester Stallone
Sheldon Lettich
Based on Characters created by
David Morrell
Starring Sylvester Stallone
Richard Crenna
Marc de Jonge
Kurtwood Smith
Sasson Gabai
Spiros Focas
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Cinematography John Stanier
Editing by O. Nicholas Brown
Andrew London
James R. Symons
Edward Warschilka
Studio Carolco Pictures
Distributed by TriStar Pictures
Release date(s) May 25, 1988
Running time 101 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $62,000,000 [1]
Gross revenue Domestic:
$53,715,611
Worldwide:
$189,015,611

Rambo III (also known as Rambo : First Blood Part III in Malaysia) is an American action/war film released on May 25, 1988. It is the third film in the Rambo series following First Blood and Rambo: First Blood Part II. It was in turn followed by Rambo in 2008, making it the last film to feature Richard Crenna as “Colonel Sam Trautman”.

One minute of the movie was censored in the United Kingdom.[2]

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Plot

The film opens with Colonel Sam Trautman (Richard Crenna) returning to Thailand to once again enlist the help of Vietnam veteran John J. Rambo (Sylvester Stallone). After witnessing Rambo’s victory in a stick fighting match, Trautman visits the construction site of the Buddhist temple Rambo is helping to build and asks Rambo to join him on a mission to Afghanistan. The mission is meant to supply weapons, including FIM-92 Stinger missiles, to Afghan rebels, the Mujahideen, who are fighting the Soviets in the Soviet-Afghan War. Despite showing him photos of civilians suffering under Soviet military intervention, Rambo refuses and Trautman chooses to go on his own.

While in Afghanistan, Trautman’s troops are ambushed by Soviet troops while passing through the mountains at night. Trautman is imprisoned in a Soviet base and coerced for information by Colonel Zaysen (Marc de Jonge) and his henchman Kourov (Randy Raney). Rambo learns of the incident from embassy field officer Robert Griggs (Kurtwood Smith) and convinces Griggs to take him through an unofficial operation, despite Grigg’s warning that the U.S. government will deny any knowledge of his actions if killed or caught. Rambo immediately flies to Peshawar (present Pakistan) where he meets up with Mousa Ghanin (Sasson Gabai), a weapons supplier who agrees to take him to Khost, a village deep in the Afghan desert, after Rambo threatens him, close to the Soviet base where Trautman is kept enslaved. The Mujahideen in the village, led by the village’s main leader Masoud (Spiros Focas), are already hesitant to help Rambo in the first place, but are definitely convinced not to help him when their village is attacked by Soviet helicopters after one of Mousa’s shop assistants has informed the Soviets of Rambo’s presence. Aided only by Mousa and a young boy named Hamid (Doudi Shoua), Rambo makes his way to the Soviet base and starts his plan to free Trautman. The first attempt is unsuccessful and results not only in Hamid getting shot in the leg, but also in Rambo himself getting wood fragments in the side. After escaping from the base, Rambo tends to Hamid’s wounds and sends him and Mousa away to safety, before cauterising his own wound.

The next day, Rambo returns to the base, after scaling a cliff on the fort’s perimeter to avoid detection, just in time to rescue Trautman from being tortured with a flamethrower. After rescuing several other prisoners, Rambo steals a Mil Mi-24 helicopter and escapes from the base. However, the helicopter is damaged as it departs and soon crashes, forcing Rambo and Trautman to continue on foot. After a confrontation in a cave, where Rambo and Trautman eliminate several Soviet Spetsnaz commandos, including Kourov, they are confronted by an entire army of Soviet tanks, headed by Zaysen. Zaysen warns them to drop their weapons and comply to his orders saying that they cannot escape and he wants to take them back alive. To which Trautman says to Rambo “what do you say, John?” and Rambo replies, loading his gun, “Fuck ’em”. Just as they are about to be overwhelmed by the might of the Soviet Army, the Mujahideen warriors, together with Mousa and Hamid, ride onto the battlefield by the hundreds in a cavalry charge, overwhelming the Soviets. In the ensuing battle, in which both Trautman and John are wounded, Rambo somehow manages to kill Zaysen by driving a tank into the Soviet colonel’s helicopter, which he first tried to damage with a Molotov cocktail, handed to him by a man on a horse. Somehow, Rambo survives the explosion and gets out of the tank. At the end of the battle Rambo and Trautman say goodbye to their Mujahideen friends and leave Afghanistan to go home. The movie ends with two quotes: “This film is dedicated to the gallant people of Afghanistan.” and “I am like a bullet, filled with lead and made to kill However, this was a not the original quote in the movie. Prior to the American war in Afghanistan, the ending quote of the movie read “This film is dedicated to the brave Mujahideen fighters of Afghanistan“. This was then edited to read “people of Afghanistan” during the post 9/11 era.

[edit] Production

Some critics note that the timing of the movie, with its unabashedly anti-Soviet tone, ran afoul of the opening of Communism to the West under Mikhail Gorbachev, which had already changed the image of the Soviet Union to a substantial degree by the time the movie was finished.[3] With the start of the latest War in Afghanistan the display of the Mujahideen as friends of the United states gave the movie a new political undertone altogether.

The 1990 Guinness World Records deemed Rambo III the most violent film ever made, with 221 acts of violence, at least 70 explosions, and over 108 characters killed on-screen. However, the body count of the fourth film in the series, Rambo, surpassed that record, with 261 kills. The Mi-24 Hind-D helicopters seen in the film are in fact modified Aérospatiale SA 330 Puma transport helicopters with fabricated bolt-on wings similar to the real Hind-Ds which were mainly used in the former Soviet bloc nations. The other helicopter depicted is a slightly reshaped Aerospatiale Gazelle.

An extensive film score was written by Oscar-winning American composer Jerry Goldsmith, conducting the Hungarian State Opera Orchestra; however, much of it was not used. Instead, much of the music Goldsmith penned for the previous installment was recycled. The original album, released by Scotti Bros., contained only a portion of the new music as well as three songs, only one of which was used in the movie (Bill Medley‘s version of “He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother,” played over the end credits).

  1. It Is Our Destiny – Bill Medley (4:30)
  2. Preparations (4:58)
  3. Afghanistan (2:35)
  4. The Game (2:23)
  5. Another Time (3:54)
  6. He Ain’t Heavy, He’s My Brother – Bill Medley (4:30)
  7. Aftermath (2:42)
  8. Questions (3:34)
  9. The Bridge – Giorgio Moroder featuring Joe Pizullo (3:59)
  10. Final Battle (4:47)

A more complete 75-minute version of the score was later released by Intrada.

  1. Another Time (3:58)
  2. Preparations (06:21)
  3. The Money (:52)
  4. I’m Used To It (01:00)
  5. Peshawar (1:12)
  6. Afghanistan (2:38)
  7. Questions (3:37)
  8. Then I’ll Die (3:34)
  9. The Game (2:25)
  10. Flaming Village (4:07)
  11. The Aftermath (2:44)
  12. Night Entry (3:58)
  13. Under And Over (2:55)
  14. Night Fight (6:50)
  15. First Aid (2:46)
  16. The Long Climb (3:25)
  17. Going Down (1:52)
  18. The Cave (3:31)
  19. The Boot (1:53)
  20. You Did It, John (1:08)
  21. The Showdown (1:26)
  22. Final Battle (4:50)
  23. I’ll Stay (9:00)
  • Although the film is called Rambo III, it’s the 2nd sequel in the First Blood series thus also making it First Blood Part III.

 

[edit] Filming schedule

The movie was shot between August 1987 and December 1987.

[edit] Shooting locations

The movie was shot mainly in Thailand and Israel. The scene in the Buddhist Monastery was shot in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Some scenes were filmed in Bangkok, Thailand while others were shot in Eilat, Jaffa and Tel Aviv, Israel. The Afghan market scene was a decorated set in Peshawer, Pakistan while the final scenes were shot at the Fort Yuma Indian Reservation, Yuma, Arizona, USA.

[edit] Cast

[edit] Release and reception

Rambo III opened in the US on May 25th, 1988, and took $13,034,238 at 2,562 theatres in its opening weekend (the 4 day Memorial Day weekend), ranked #2 behind Crocodile Dundee II, which took $24,462,976.[4][5] Overall in the US the movie took $53,715,611 and then took $135,300,000 internationally, giving Rambo III a box office total of $189,015,611. The movie is the second most successful of the Rambo series, behind Rambo: First Blood Part II. Much like its predecessor, it was well-received with the target young male audience, but panned heavily by fans and critics.[6] It scored a 36% on Rotten Tomatoes, based on 28 reviews. It also has an average rating of 4.9/10 on imdb.com from around 30,000 votes. Prominent critics Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert (of At the Movies fame) were split on Rambo III, with Siskel awarding the film “thumbs up”, and Ebert declaring “thumbs down” for those expecting more out of Rambo III. Ebert did, however, give “thumbs up” to fans, saying the film was entertaining and that it “delivers the goods”. The New York Times took a dim view of the Movie.[7]

[edit] Rentals and overall figures

The movie made $28,509,000 on video rentals in the US, which when added to the box office take of $189,015,611 gives a known total of $217,524,611.[8] The international figures for rentals/DVD sales are not known but are estimated to take the movie over the $300m mark.

[edit] Other media

  • David Morrell, author of First Blood, the novel the first Rambo film is based on, wrote a novelization.
  • In the movie “Twins” (1988), Arnold Schwarzenegger‘s character is seeing looking at the poster of Rambo III featuring Stallone, where he smiles and then walks away.
  • In 1990, Sega released a game based on the film, aptly titled Rambo III. The company would later reuse the film’s climactic battle sequence as the first stage of the 2008 arcade light gun game Rambo.
  • A comic book adaptation of the film was published by Blackthorne Publishing. Blackthorne also published a 3D version of its Rambo III comic.

[edit] References

  1. ^ “`Crocodile’ rocks the box offic”. USA Today. http://pqasb.pqarchiver.com/USAToday/access/55842367.html?dids=55842367:55842367&FMT=ABS&FMTS=ABS:FT&type=current&date=Jun+14,+1988&author=Susan+Spillman&pub=USA+TODAY+(pre-1997+Fulltext)&desc=`Crocodile’+rocks+the+box+office&pqatl=google. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  2. ^ “Movies”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1988-08-25/entertainment/ca-1115_1_rambo-iii. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  3. ^ “Preview Review: Rambo IV”. http://www.exile.ru/articles/detail.php?ARTICLE_ID=10145&IBLOCK_ID=35
  4. ^ “WEEKEND BOX OFFICE : Crocodile Swamps ‘Rambo’; Hanks’ ‘Big’ Hit”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1988-06-14/entertainment/ca-4175_1_big-business. Retrieved 2011-01-01. 
  5. ^ Blank, Ed. “‘Croc’ devours ‘Rambo’ in first week in theaters”. Pittsburgh Press. http://news.google.ca/newspapers?id=ad4cAAAAIBAJ&pg=3841,1104602. Retrieved 29 October 2010. 
  6. ^ “Roger Rabbit’ Hops to Box-Office Top; ‘Coming to America’ Hits 2nd”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1989-01-05/entertainment/ca-271_1_box-office-information/2. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  7. ^ “Reviews/Film; Stallone’s ‘Rambo III,’ Globe-Trotting Cowboy For the 80’s Audience”. The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/1988/05/25/movies/reviews-film-stallone-s-rambo-iii-globe-trotting-cowboy-for-the-80-s-audience.html. Retrieved 2010-10-29. 
  8. ^ “Movie Hype-Is Anyone Listening? Big Doses of Publicity Don’t Always Mean Box-Office Bucks”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1988-12-13/entertainment/ca-265_1_box-office. Retrieved 2010-12-05. 

[edit] External links

[show]v·d·eRamboVideo games

Other

Characters

 
First Blood (1982)
Soundtrack • Novel
Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985)
Soundtrack • Novel  • Games
Rambo III (1988)
Soundtrack • Novel  • Game
Rambo (2008)
Soundtrack
 
 
David Morrell • Jimmy Lile • Gil Hibben • Rambo and the Forces of Freedom • The Intruder • Son of Rambow
 
[show]v·d·eWorks of Sylvester StalloneDirector

Writer

Producer

Soundtrack

Related articles

 
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rocky IV (1985) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010) · The Expendables 2 (2012)
 
The Lords of Flatbush (1974) · Rocky (1976) · F.I.S.T. (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · First Blood (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rhinestone (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Rocky IV (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Over the Top (1987) · Rambo III (1988) · Rocky V (1990) · Cliffhanger (1993) · Driven (2001) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010) · The Expendables 2 (2012)
 
Staying Alive (1983) · Heart of a Champion: The Ray Mancini Story (1985) · Driven (2001) · The Contender (2005–present)
 
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rhinestone (1984)
 
[show]v·d·eFilms directed by Peter MacDonald1980s

1990s

 
Rambo III (1988)
 

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants

Actions

// // // //

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

// <![CDATA[
/*

Rambo: First Blood Part II

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  (Redirected from Rambo II)

Jump to: navigation, search

Rambo: First Blood Part II

Rambo: First Blood Part II movie poster
Directed by George P. Cosmatos
Sylvester Stallone
(uncredited)[1]
Produced by Buzz Feitshans
Mario Kassar
Andrew G. Vajna
Screenplay by Sylvester Stallone
James Cameron
Story by Kevin Jarre
Based on Characters created by
David Morrell
Starring Sylvester Stallone
Richard Crenna
Charles Napier
Steven Berkoff
Julia Nickson
Julian Turner
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Peter Schless
Cinematography Jack Cardiff
Editing by Larry Bock
Mark Goldblatt
Mark Helfrich
Gib Jaffe
Frank E. Jiminez
Studio Anabasis Investments
Distributed by TriStar Pictures
Release date(s) May 22, 1985
Running time 94 min.
Country United States
Language English
Budget $44,000,000 (est.)
Gross revenue Domestic:
$150,415,432
Worldwide:
$300,400,432

Rambo: First Blood Part II (mostly known as Rambo II, it was formerly primarily known as Rambo) is a 1985 action film. A sequel to 1982’s First Blood, it is the second installment in the Rambo series starring Sylvester Stallone, who reprises his role as Vietnam veteran John Rambo. Picking up where the first film left, the sequel is set in the context of the Vietnam War POW/MIA issue; it sees Rambo released from prison by Federal order to document the possible existence of POWs in Vietnam, under the belief that he will find nothing, thus enabling the government to sweep the issue under the rug.

Rambo: First Blood Part II was ostensibly directed by George P. Cosmatos; it was later revealed that Stallone had most of the directorial control during filming.[1] The film was on the ballot for the American Film Institute‘s 100 Years… 100 Cheers, a list of America’s most inspiring movies.[2] Entertainment Weekly ranked the movie number 23 on its list of The Best Rock-’em, Sock-’em Movies of the Past 25 Years.[3]

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Plot

Rambo is working in a labor camp prison when he gets a visit from his former commander, Colonel Sam Trautman (Richard Crenna). Trautman offers Rambo the chance to be released from prison after the events of the first film and given full clemency, but on condition of him going into Vietnam to search for American POWs. Rambo meets Marshal Murdock (Charles Napier), an American bureaucrat who is in charge of the operation and he tells Rambo that the American public is demanding knowledge about the POWs and they want a trained commando to go in and search for them. Rambo is briefed that he is only to photograph the POWs and not to rescue them, nor is he to engage any enemy soldiers. Rambo reluctantly agrees and he is then told that an agent of the American government will be there to receive him in the jungles of Vietnam.

Rambo parachutes into the Vietnamese jungles, but loses most of his equipment in the process and is left only with his knives, his bow, and arrows. He meets the agent, a native girl named Co-Bao (Julia Nickson) who wants to go to America, and who arranges for her and Rambo to go upstream with a group of river pirates. Rambo comes to the camp, and in contradiction to his briefing, he finds American prisoners there and rescues one of them from a makeshift crucifixion. Later at the camp, a patrol discovers a dead sentry whom Rambo eliminated with a throwing knife. In response, a large patrol goes out into the jungles in search of the (unknown to them) intruder. Rambo, Co and the American POW escape with the pirates, but are attacked by a Vietnamese gunboat and are promptly betrayed by the pirates, who fear the military’s reprisals should they not cooperate; Rambo sends Co and the POW to safety and manages to destroy the gunboat with an RPG and kill all the pirates. When Rambo calls for extraction, he is denied as Murdock fears what will happen to him and his party if the American public come to know about it.

Rambo and the American POW are recaptured. Rambo’s wrists are bound to an oxen yoke and he is lowered naked into a leech-infested cesspool (or possibly a pit dug especially for the purpose of torture). Later Rambo learns that the Soviet Army is aiding the Vietnamese and training them, and is tortured badly by a Soviet officer, Lt. Col. Podovsky (Steven Berkoff) and his silent, robust henchman Sergeant Yushin. Rambo is ordered to contact the American military and tell them that they should not send any more commandos for rescue operations in Vietnam. Meanwhile, Co enters the camp in the guise of a prostitute and comes to the hut in which Rambo is held captive. Rambo agrees to Podovsky’s condition, but instead threatens Murdock on the radio that he is “coming to get you”, then escapes from captivity into a nearby jungle with Co’s help. Co then tends to Rambo’s wounds and begins to implore him to take her to the United States. Rambo agrees and they kiss, however they are then attacked by some Vietnamese soldiers and Co is killed. Rambo kills them all (except for their commander, who escapes, but is later killed by one of Rambo’s exploding arrows) and then buries Co’s body in the jungle.

Following his escape, the camp’s Soviet and Vietnamese soldiers are sent to look for him. Rambo assembles his weapons, and using guerilla warfare tactics, is able to kill a large number of enemy troops. He proceeds to a small enemy camp and destroys it and several vehicles with explosive arrows. He hijacks a UH-1N Twin Huey helicopter from the Soviets after killing Sergeant Yushin and proceeds towards the POW camp. He destroys most of the camp with the helicopter, then lands and arms himself with the M60 machine gun that is mounted on the Huey, kills the remaining soldiers, and rescues all the POWs. They get to the helicopter and head towards the American camp in Thailand. Lt. Col. Podovsky chases them in his Mil Mi-24 helicopter gunship. Although Rambo’s helicopter is heavily damaged by Podovsky’s helicopter, he manages to land his helicopter on a river, then fakes his death. When Podovsky comes near him and gets careless, Rambo fires a LAW at Podovsky’s chopper, obliterating it.

Rambo then returns to the base and wrecks Murdock’s command center. He threatens Murdock with a knife, challenging him to find and rescue the remaining American POWs in Vietnam. Trautman then comforts Rambo and tries to pacify him. An angry Rambo responds that he only wants his country to love its soldiers as much as its soldiers love it. As Rambo leaves, Trautman asks him, “How will you live, John?” To which Rambo replies, “Day by day.” The film credits roll as Rambo walks off into the distance while his mentor watches him.

[edit] Rambo’s ‘military career’

Rambo’s stats, as given in the film: “Rambo, John J., born 7/6/47 Bowie, Arizona of Native American and German descent. Joined army 8/6/64. Accepted, Special Forces specialization, light weapons, cross-trained as medic. Helicopter and language qualified, 59 confirmed kills, two Silver Stars, four Bronze, four Purple Hearts, Distinguished Service Cross, Congressional Medal of Honor.” At the end of the movie, Trautman comments that Rambo would probably receive a second Congressional Medal of Honor for rescuing the POWs.

[edit] Production

The producers of the movie considered that Rambo would have a partner in the rescue mission of POWs. The producers allegedly wanted John Travolta to play Rambo’s partner, but Stallone vetoed the idea.[4] Lee Marvin (who was considered to play Colonel Trautman in the first film) was also originally set to play Marshall Murdock, but declined. James Cameron’s original title for the film was First Blood II: The Mission.

[edit] Filming schedule

The movie was shot between June 1984 and August 1984.

[edit] Shooting locations

The movie was shot entirely on location in Mexico. The waterfall explosion scene was shot in Acapulco, Guerrero, Mexico and the rest of the movie in Tecoanapa, Guerrero, Mexico.

[edit] Cast

[edit] Reception

Overall reactions from critics and the public was generally negative.[5] The film earned a 30% “Rotten” rating in the review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes.[6] In the 6th Golden Raspberry Awards, the film “won” the award for Worst Picture, Worst Actor for Sylvester Stallone, Worst Screenplay for the story written by Kevin Jarre, the screenplay written by James Cameron and Sylvester Stallone, and characters created by David Morrell, and Worst Original Song for “Peace in Our Life” by Frank Stallone, lyrics by Stallone, and music by Stallone, Peter Schless and Jerry Goldsmith. The film was nominated for Worst Supporting Actress for Julia Nickson-Soul, the Worst Director for George Cosmatos, and the Worst New Star for Julia Nickson-Soul.

Despite the negative reception, it was very popular among the audience and fans alike and has since become a cult classic, also the film was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Sound Editing.[7] and won the Golden Screen in Germany.

[edit] Box Office

Rambo: First Blood Part II opened in the US on May 22, 1985, and was the #1 movie that weekend, taking $20,176,217 on 2,074 screens (which made it the first film in the US to be shown on 2,000+ screens). Overall, in the US, the movie took $150,415,432 and then took $149,985,000 internationally, giving Rambo: First Blood Part II a box office total of $300,400,432. The movie is easily the most successful of the Rambo series, with Rambo III in 2nd place with $189,015,611, First Blood in 3rd place with $125,212,904 and Rambo taking 4th place with $113,244,290. Rambo: First Blood Part II is Stallone’s second biggest movie of all time, just slightly behind Rocky IV, which took $300,473,716, also in 1985, making it Stallone’s most successful year ever with over $600m for the two movies.

[edit] Rentals and overall figures

The movie made $78,919,000 in rentals in the US alone. DVD’s of each of the first three movies in the series have been released and selling since 1998, but no figures are available for these as of yet. As the movie took $300,400,432 at the box office and $78,919,000 from US rentals, it is estimated that with European/international DVD sales of Rambo: First Blood Part II, the overall take for the movie is somewhere in the region of $400–500m.

[edit] Soundtrack

The musical score for the movie was done by Jerry Goldsmith, conducting the National Philharmonic Orchestra. The main song in the movie is sung by Stallone’s brother, singer/songwriter Frank Stallone. Varèse Sarabande issued the original soundtrack album.

  1. Main Title (2:12)
  2. Preparations (1:16)
  3. The Jump (3:18)
  4. The Snake (1:48)
  5. Stories (3:26)
  6. The Cage (3:55)
  7. Betrayed (4:22)
  8. Escape From Torture (3:39)
  9. Ambush (2:45)
  10. Revenge (6:14)
  11. Bowed Down (1:04)
  12. Pilot Over (1:52)
  13. Home Flight (3:01)
  14. Day by Day (2:06)
  15. Peace In Our Life – music by Frank Stallone, Peter Schless and Jerry Goldsmith; lyrics by Frank Stallone; performed by Frank Stallone (3:18)

Note: As released in the United Kingdom by That’s Entertainment Records (the British licensee for Varèse Sarabande at the time), the UK version placed “Peace In Our Life” between “Betrayed” and “Escape From Torture,” thus making “Day By Day” the final track.

In 1999 Silva America released an expanded edition with the cues in film order. Previously unreleased music is in bold.

  1. Main Title (2:14)
  2. The Map (1:09)
  3. Preparations (1:18)
  4. The Jump (3:19)
  5. The Snake (1:49)
  6. The Pirates (1:29)
  7. Stories (3:27)
  8. The Camp/Forced Entry (2:24)
  9. The Cage (3:57)
  10. River Crash/The Gunboat (3:37)
  11. Betrayed (4:24)
  12. Bring Him Up/The Eyes (2:06)
  13. Escape From Torture (3:41)
  14. Ambush (2:47)
  15. Revenge (6:16)
  16. Bowed Down (1:06)
  17. Pilot Over (1:54)
  18. Village Raid/Helicopter Fight (4:55)
  19. Home Flight (3:02)
  20. Day By Day (2:08)
  21. Peace In Our Life – Frank Stallone (3:19)

[edit] Other media

  • A novelization was written by David Morrell, author of the novel First Blood, on which the first Rambo film was based.
  • During the 80’s tons and tons of video games came out in the wake of the series. The plots and characters had many simliarites to the games, such as Cross Fire, Commando and its sequel Bionic Commando, Guerilla War, Defender, Operation Wolf, Gun Smoke, and had some inspiration for the popular series Contra.
  • There was a ZX Spectrum, Amstrad CPC and Commodore 64 game of the same name, based upon the movie. There was also an NES as well as Sega Master System, and MSX and DOS games based on the film.
  • Officially licensed knives from the movie, based on Jimmy Lile‘s designs were made by both United Cutlery and Master Cutlery. Master Cutlery fabricated both a standard and Limited Edition version. The Master Cutlery versions are push tang construction, have a hollow aluminum cord gripped handle that contains an emergency survival kit, and a precision compass mounted in the pommel. The stainless guards incorporate standard and Phillips head screwdriver points in the design. They are 1/4″ thick 420 J2 stainless blades.
  • In late 80’s Rambo: First Blood Part II inspired many low budget action films creators. These included Bruno Mattei’s Strike Commando (1987) and Strike Commando 2 (1988), as well as Slash (1984), Phantom Raiders (1988) and Commander (1988).

[edit] References

  1. ^ a b Beck, Henry Cabot. “The “Western” Godfather“. True West Magazine. October 2006.
  2. ^ “AFI’s 100 Years… 100 Thrills: Official Ballot”. AFI.com. http://connect.afi.com/site/DocServer/cheers300.pdf?docID=201. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  3. ^ “The Action 25 Films: The Best Rock-’em, Sock-’em Movies of the Past 25 Years”. Entertainment Weekly. January 30, 2009. http://www.ew.com/ew/gallery/0,,20219939_3,00.html. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  4. ^ We Get to Win This Time, 2002, Artisan Entertainment
  5. ^ “Movie Review : Why A ‘Rambo Ii’? For Muddiest Of Reasons”. The Los Angeles Times. http://articles.latimes.com/1985-05-22/entertainment/ca-16965_1. Retrieved 2010-11-26. 
  6. ^ Rotten Tomatoes
  7. ^ Rambo: First Blood Part II: Award Wins and Nominations”. IMDb.com. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0089880/awards. Retrieved June 11, 2010. 

[edit] External links

Awards
Preceded by
Bolero
Razzie Award for Worst Picture
6th Golden Raspberry Awards
Succeeded by
Howard the Duck and Under the Cherry Moon
[show]v·d·eRamboVideo games

Other

Characters

 
First Blood (1982)
Soundtrack • Novel
Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985)
Soundtrack • Novel  • Games
Rambo III (1988)
Soundtrack • Novel  • Game
Rambo (2008)
Soundtrack
 
 
David Morrell • Jimmy Lile • Gil Hibben • Rambo and the Forces of Freedom • The Intruder • Son of Rambow
 
[show]v·d·eWorks of Sylvester StalloneDirector

Writer

Producer

Soundtrack

Related articles

 
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rocky IV (1985) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010) · The Expendables 2 (2012)
 
The Lords of Flatbush (1974) · Rocky (1976) · F.I.S.T. (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · First Blood (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rhinestone (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Rocky IV (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Over the Top (1987) · Rambo III (1988) · Rocky V (1990) · Cliffhanger (1993) · Driven (2001) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010) · The Expendables 2 (2012)
 
Staying Alive (1983) · Heart of a Champion: The Ray Mancini Story (1985) · Driven (2001) · The Contender (2005–present)
 
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rhinestone (1984)
 
[show]v·d·eFilms directed by George P. Cosmatos1970s

1980s

1990s

 
 
Of Unknown Origin (1983) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Leviathan (1989)
 
Tombstone (1993) · Shadow Conspiracy (1997)
[show]v · d ·eJames CameronFilms

Documentaries

Producer/writer

Associates

Production company

 
Piranha II: The Spawning (1981) • The Terminator (1984) • Aliens (1986) • The Abyss (1989) • Terminator 2: Judgment Day (1991) • True Lies (1994) • Titanic (1997) • Avatar (2009)
 
 
Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) • Point Break (1991) • Strange Days (1995) • Dark Angel (2000–02) • Solaris (2002) • Exodus Decoded (2006) • The Lost Tomb of Jesus (2007)  • Sanctum (2011)
 
 
[show]v · d · eGolden Raspberry Award for Worst Picture
 
1980-1989

Can’t Stop the Music (1980) · Mommie Dearest (1981) · Inchon (1982) · The Lonely Lady (1983) · Bolero (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Howard the Duck / Under the Cherry Moon (1986) · Leonard Part 6 (1987) · Cocktail (1988) · Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (1989)

 
1990-1999
 
2000-2009

Battlefield Earth (2000) · Freddy Got Fingered (2001) · Swept Away (2002) · Gigli (2003) · Catwoman (2004) · Dirty Love (2005) · Basic Instinct 2 (2006) · I Know Who Killed Me (2007) · The Love Guru (2008) · Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009)

 
2010-2019
 
Wikimedia Commons · Wikiquote
[show]v · d · eGolden Raspberry Award for Worst Screenplay
 
1980-1989

Can’t Stop the Music (1980) · Mommie Dearest (1981) · Inchon (1982) · The Lonely Lady (1983) · Bolero (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Howard the Duck (1986) · Leonard Part 6 (1987) · Cocktail (1988) · Harlem Nights (1989)

 
1990-1999

The Adventures of Ford Fairlane (1990) · Hudson Hawk (1991) · Stop! Or My Mom Will Shoot (1992) · Indecent Proposal (1993) · The Flintstones (1994) · Showgirls (1995) · Striptease (1996) · The Postman (1997) · An Alan Smithee Film: Burn Hollywood Burn (1998) · Wild Wild West (1999)

 
2000-2009
 
2010-present
 
Wikimedia Commons · Wikiquote

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants

Actions

// // // //

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

Charles Sisto Malatesta 3/27/11

// <![CDATA[
/*

First Blood

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

For other uses, see First Blood (disambiguation).
First Blood

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Ted Kotcheff
Produced by Buzz Feitshans
Mario Kassar
Andrew G. Vajna
Screenplay by Michael Kozoll
William Sackheim
Sylvester Stallone
Based on The novel by
David Morrell
Starring Sylvester Stallone
Richard Crenna
Brian Dennehy
Music by Jerry Goldsmith
Cinematography Andrew Laszlo
Editing by Joan E. Chapman
Studio Anabasis Investments N.V.
Distributed by Orion Pictures
Release date(s) October 22, 1982
Running time 97 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $14 million
Gross revenue $125,212,904

First Blood (also known as Rambo: First Blood Part 1 outside the United States) is a 1982 action/thriller film directed by Ted Kotcheff. The film stars Sylvester Stallone as John Rambo, a troubled and misunderstood Vietnam War veteran, with Sheriff Will Teasle (Brian Dennehy) as his nemesis and Colonel Samuel Trautman (Richard Crenna) as his former commander and only ally. It was released on October 22, 1982. Based on David Morrell’s 1972 novel of the same name, it was the first of the Rambo series. Unlike the sequels, which were war adventure films set in foreign countries, First Blood was a post-Vietnam War psychological thriller set in the United States. First Blood lacks the gore and violence that would become a trademark of the series, as Art Galt’s death is the only death in the film.

Since its release, First Blood has been a critical and commercial success and has had a lasting influence on the genre. It has also spurred countless parodies. The film is notable for its psychological portrayal of the after-effects of the Vietnam War, particularly the challenges faced by American veterans attempting to re-integrate into society, something not deeply examined in subsequent Rambo movies.

In 2008, the film was chosen by Empire magazine as one of The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time.

Contents

[hide]

[edit] Plot

John Rambo (Sylvester Stallone) is a former member of an elite United States Army Special Forces unit and was awarded the Medal of Honor for his service in the Vietnam War. The film begins after the war, in America, and takes place in December 1982. Rambo is searching for one of his friends from his unit, Delmare Berry and soon learns that he has died from cancer due to Agent Orange exposure. Although not yet revealed to the audience, Rambo knows he is now the last surviving member of his unit. The scene cuts to Rambo entering the small town of Hope (actually Hope, British Columbia) on foot. With his long hair and military-style coat, he is quickly spotted by the town’s overzealous and paranoid sheriff, Will Teasle (Brian Dennehy) who quickly drives Rambo out of town, noting his strong distaste for “drifters.” Rambo heads back toward town immediately, to the dismay of Teasle who arrests him.

Rambo stands his ground against the officers at the station and is brutalized and harassed by Art Galt (Jack Starrett), the sheriff’s cruel head deputy and closest friend. While being processed, Rambo has flashbacks to his time as a prisoner of war. When Galt and two other officers (Chris Mulkey and David Caruso) attempt to dry-shave him with a straight razor, Rambo has a flashback to being tortured in a North Vietnamese P.O.W. Camp back in 1969 and loses control, escaping on instinct using his military training. He fights his way out of the station, assaulting most of the officers, throws a civilian off a motorcycle, steals it, and is pursued into the nearby mountains. The deputies are eventually forced to search for Rambo on foot and he climbs down onto a steep cliff to elude capture. After spotting Rambo from a helicopter, Galt blatantly disregards protocol and attempts to shoot him in cold blood. Rambo drops into a mass of trees and cornered, throws a rock at the helicopter in self-defense. The helicopter, struck by the projectile, pitches, causing Galt to fall to his death. Teasle, who did not see Galt’s attempt to kill Rambo, vows to avenge his friend’s death.

Teasle leads his deputies into the woods in an attempt to capture Rambo. The deputies are inexperienced and bicker, particularly after learning over the radio about Rambo’s combat experience and status as a war hero. Rambo quickly disables the small, disorganized team using guerrilla tactics and booby traps, severely wounding but not killing the deputies. In the chaos, Rambo isolates and confronts Teasle with a knife to the throat. “Don’t push it or I’ll give you a war you won’t believe. Let it go” he warns before disappearing into the woods. A base camp is assembled near the site and the National Guard is called in. United States Special Forces Colonel Sam Trautman (Richard Crenna) arrives, taking credit for training Rambo. He is surprised to find any of the deputies still alive and warns that it would be safer to let Rambo go and find him after the situation has calmed down. Fueled by a mixture of scorn and pride, Teasle refuses to heed his advice.

Rambo is eventually cornered by the National Guard in a mine entrance. The novice guardsmen fire a M72 LAW rocket at him, collapsing the entrance and trapping him inside. They assume Rambo is dead. Unbeknownst to his pursuers, Rambo has escaped into the tunnels of the mine. Rambo finds some old fuel and makes an improvised torch. After wading through waist‑deep water and fighting off rats, Rambo cleverly uses the flame of the torch (as an indicator of air flow) to find an escape. Rambo hijacks a passing M135 2½ ton cargo truck and returns to town, crashing it into a gas station. He blocks the highway to anyone in pursuit by igniting the spilled fuel, also destroying the stolen truck. Armed with an M60 machine gun, Rambo destroys a sporting goods shop and a few other businesses in an attempt to confuse Teasle and identify his position before spotting him on the roof of the police station.

Rambo carefully enters the police station. Aware of Teasle’s presence on the roof, Rambo darts under the skylight to draw fire as bait to reveal his exact location. Teasle immediately fires at Rambo who notes his position and returns fire through the ceiling with the M60, injuring him. Teasle falls through the skylight onto the floor. Rambo steps over him, prepared to kill him. Before Rambo can shoot Teasle, Colonel Trautman appears and tells him that there is no hope of escaping alive. Rambo, now surrounded by the police, rages about the horrors of war and the difficulties he has faced adapting to civilian life; he’s tired of being misunderstood, and how in the army he was a war hero but back in America he could not even be trusted to work parking cars. He weeps as he recounts a particularly gruesome story about witnessing his friend dying by having his legs blown off by a booby-trapped shoeshine box planted by a Viet Cong child operative. Rambo then turns himself in to Trautman and is arrested. The credits roll as he and Trautman exit the police station.

[edit] Deleted scenes

[edit] TV version

The TV version of First Blood premiered on NBC on Sunday night, May 12, 1985, as a tie-in to Rambo: First Blood Part II. 3 minutes were edited out and any suggestive dialog was changed. However, the following scenes were added in order to make up for anything that was cut:

  • A scene in the beginning where Rambo tries to order takeout at a diner but then gets hassled, making Rambo leave.
  • A scene after the posse is injured.
  • A scene showing the Paramedics putting the posse in ambulances and Galt’s body into a helicopter just as Kern arrives.
  • A longer version of the conversation between Trautman and Teasle about Rambo taking out his posse.
  • A longer version of the conversation about the capture of Rambo.
  • A scene where Teasle and Trautman land at the spot where Rambo is “killed”.
  • A scene where Teasle returns to his office and is congratulated by the townspeople for “killing” Rambo.

None of these above scenes have ever appeared as extras on DVD or on Blu-Ray.

[edit] DVD/Blu-ray

Recent DVD/Blu-ray versions include the following deleted scenes as bonus features:

  • A scene where Rambo settles into a cave and while taking a nap, begins to have a flashback that shows Rambo and his friends at a Vietnam night club.
  • The original ending that shows Rambo killing himself with Trautman’s gun. Test-audiences found this ending to be “too depressing” so a new ending was shot and became the one seen in all versions of the film since its original release.

[edit] Cast

Main article: List of Rambo characters

[edit] Production

Long before Stallone was hired to play Rambo, other actors were being considered for the role such as Clint Eastwood, Al Pacino, Robert De Niro, Paul Newman, Steve McQueen, Nick Nolte, John Travolta, Dustin Hoffman, James Garner, Kris Kristofferson and Michael Douglas. Terence Hill, as recently confirmed during an interview to an Italian TV talk-show, was offered the role but rejected it because he considered it “too violent”. Dustin Hoffman and John Travolta declined the role for the same reason. When Al Pacino was considered for the role of John Rambo, he turned it down when his request that Rambo be more of a madman was rejected.

For the role of Sheriff Teasle, the producers approached Academy Award-winners Gene Hackman and Robert Duvall but both turned the part down. Lee Marvin, another Oscar winner, turned down the part of Col. Trautman.

Various screenplays adapted from Morrell’s book had been pitched to studios in the years since its publication but it was only when Stallone, who at the time had limited success outside of the Rocky franchise (most of his non-Rocky films either barely broke even or were flops altogether), decided to become involved with the project that it was finally brought into production.

Stallone’s star power after the success of the Rocky films enabled him to suggest changes to the script, to make the character of John Rambo more sympathetic. While Morrell’s book has the Rambo character violently kill many of his pursuers, in the movie version Rambo does not directly cause the death of any police or national guardsmen.

Prior to Stallone taking the lead role, Steve McQueen expressed interest in it. When David Morrell wrote the novel in 1972 the producers first considered McQueen but then rejected him because they considered him too old to play a Vietnam veteran from 1975.[1][2]

Just before shooting began, Kirk Douglas quit the role of Col. Trautman over a script dispute; Douglas wanted the film to end as the book did, with the death of the Rambo character. Rock Hudson was approached but was soon to undergo heart surgery and had to pass up the chance to work with Stallone. Richard Crenna was quickly hired as a replacement; the role of Trautman became the veteran character actor’s most famous role, his performance of which received much critical praise. A suicide scene was filmed but Kotcheff and Stallone opted to have Rambo turn himself in at Trautman’s urging. The town scenes in the movie were shot in Hope, British Columbia, Canada.[3] The rest of the movie was shot in Golden Ears Provincial Park and Pitt Lake in Pitt Meadows, also in British Columbia, Canada.

[edit] Music

The film’s score was composed and conducted by Jerry Goldsmith, whose theme ‘It’s A Long Road’ added a new dimension to the character, and featured in the film’s three sequels and animated spin-off. The soundtrack was originally released on LP by the Regency label, although was edited out of sequence for a more satisfying listen. The album was reissued on CD with one extra track twice, first as one of Intrada Records‘s initial titles, then as an identical release by Varese Sarabande. The complete score was released by Intrada in a 2-CD set, along with a remastered version of the original album, on November 23rd 2010, as one of their MAF unlimited titles.

Tracklist

CD 1 – Complete Original Soundtrack

1. Theme From First Blood (Pop Orchestra Version) 2. Home Coming 3. My Town 4. Under Arrest 5. The Razor 6. A Head Start 7. Hanging On 8. Over The Cliff 9. A Stitch In Time 10. Mountain Hunt 11. No Truce 12. First Blood 13. The Tunnel 14. Escape Route 15. The Truck 16. No Power/Night Attack 17. Hide And Seek 18. It’s A Long Road (Instrumental) 19. It’s A Long Road (Theme From First Blood) Vocal: Dan Hill

CD 2 – Original 1982 Soundtrack Album

1. It’s A Long Road (Theme From First Blood) Vocal: Dan Hill 2. Escape Route 3. First Blood 4. The Tunnel 5. Hanging On 6. Home Coming 7. Mountain Hunt 8. My Town 9. The Razor 10. Over The Cliff 11. It’s A Long Road (Instrumental) 12. It’s A Long Road [Recording Session Piano/Vocal Demo] 13. Carolco Logo 14. Rambo [Special Summer 1984 Trailer]

[edit] Alternate titles

In the United States, the film was released as First Blood. In International markets, the film was re-titled Rambo: First Blood. In some other countries, the film was titled simply Rambo. In Spain and Latin America the film was titled “Acorralado” (Surrounded). A few years after the film’s release, the film was broadcast on television as Rambo in the United States.

[edit] Reaction

[edit] Box office performance

First Blood, with a shooting budget of $15 million and a total domestic gross of $47 million and $125 million worldwide,[4] was a moderate financial success, compared to other films released that year. For example, E.T., with a budget of just $10.5 million, brought in nearly $12 million in its opening weekend and went on to gross over $350 million.[5] Similarly, both Tootsie and Porky’s grossed over $100 million each.[6] Stallone’s other 1982 film, Rocky III, also beat First Blood at the box office, pulling in over $12 million on its opening weekend with a total gross over $125 million domestically.[7] However, First Blood was not a commercial failure, either. Blade Runner performed comparatively at the box office, and grossed only $32 million.[8] Poltergeist, although more successful in total sales, brought in similar numbers at the box office.[9]

[edit] Critical reception

First Blood received generally favorable reviews,[10] and is considered by many to be one of the best films of 1982.[11][12][13][14] Stallone, in particular, received much praise for his performance. In his 1982 review, Roger Ebert wrote that he did not like the film’s ending, but that it was “a very good movie, well-paced, and well-acted not only by Stallone…but also by Crenna and Brian Dennehy”.[15] He even went as far as to say, “although almost all of First Blood is implausible, because it’s Stallone on the screen, we’ll buy it”. In 2000, BBC film critic Almar Haflidason noted that Stallone’s training in survival skills and hand-to-hand combat gave the film, “a raw and authentic edge that excited the audiences of the time”.[16] James Berardinelli of ReelViews called the film “a tense and effective piece of filmmaking”.[17] He noted that film’s darker tone, somber subtext, and non-exploitative violence allowed the viewer to enjoy the film not only as an action/thriller but as something with a degree of intelligence and substance. On Stallone’s performance, he wrote “it seems impossible to imagine anyone other than Stallone in the part, and his capabilities as an actor should not be dismissed”.

David Nusair of Reel Film Views praised the film stating that “First Blood is an engaging piece of work that ultimately doesn’t have a whole lot in common with its increasingly cartoonish follow-ups and is anchored by Stallone’s effective, surprisingly low-key performance”.[18] Film critic Eric D. Snider described the film as “a dark drama about war and the exorcising of demons, and an unforgettable one at that” and that “it’s a shame this film became a prototype of sorts for shoot-’em-up, one-man-against-the-world action flicks, because it’s so much better than that”.[19] He also praised Stallone’s “haunting performance which showcased great range from the actor, and provided the film with its resonating depth and thought-provoking morality”. Alex Sandell of Juicy Cerebellum called the film “a thriller that’s actually thrilling”.[20]

The film has not escaped criticism. Although Bill Chambers of Film Freak Central praised Stallone’s performance, stating that he “hits his climactic breakdown monologue out of the park” with a performance that was “sweet and moving,” he gave the film two stars out of four. He stated “devotees of Joseph Campbell embrace First Blood because it has clear mythological roots, but recognizable art isn’t always valid art”.[21] Brian Webster of the Apollo film site called First Blood, “an embarrassingly sloppy production,” with a weak script.[22] Leonard Maltin gave the film one-and a half stars out of four, saying that it “throws all creditability to the winds about the time [Rambo] gets off with only a bad cut after jumping from a mountain into some jagged rocks.”[23]

First Blood’s portrayal of a Vietnam veteran also sparked some controversy. Bill Chambers argued the film “reflect[ed] a new compassion towards traumatized veterans of the Vietnam conflict”,[24] while others[who?] view the film as insulting and stereotypical.[citation needed]

[edit] Legacy

In 2008, First Blood was named the 253rd greatest film ever by Empire magazine on their 2008 list of The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time.[25] The character of John Rambo was considered a possible candidate for the American Film Institute‘s list 100 Years…100 Heroes and Villains.[26] The film itself was also a candidate for AFI’s 100 Years…100 Thrills, a list of America’s most heart-pounding movies.[27]

First Blood’s release on DVD sparked a series of contemporary reviews, earning it an 86% “Fresh” rating from Rotten Tomatoes[28] and a score of 62 (“generally favorable”) from Metacritic.[29]

In a 2011 article for Blade Magazine, by Mike Carter, credit is given to Morrell and the Rambo franchise for revitalizing the cutlery industry in the 1980s; due to the presence of the Jimmy Lile and Gil Hibben knives used in the films. In 2003, Blade Magazine gave Morrell an industry achievement award for having helped to make it possible.[30]

[edit] References in popular culture

The Simpsons episode “Separate Vocations” references the film. Bart envisions himself as a drifter holding a green Army duffel bag who complains how the sheriff drove him out of town, echoing the sequence in First Blood where John Rambo is ushered out of town by the sheriff for being a drifter.[31]

In the “Mac and Dennis: Manhunters” episode of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Frank (Danny DeVito) recalls his return from Vietnam in the same context as Rambo. The Gang quickly point this out and recall that this isn’t the first time he has described his past as that of John Rambo’s.

In I’m Gonna Git You Sucka Keenan Ivory Wayans as Jack Spade parodies the scene where John Rambo stitches a wound in his arm, though its only a small cut on his finger he stitches with the dramatic scream and mimicking Rambo’s reaction.

[edit] Distribution

Author David Morrell recorded an audio commentary track for the First Blood Special Edition DVD released in 2002. Actor Sylvester Stallone recorded an audio commentary track for the First Blood Ultimate Edition DVD released in 2004. This edition also includes a “never-before-seen” alternate ending in which Rambo commits suicide (a brief snippet of which appears in a flashback in the fourth film) and a “humorous” ending tacked on afterwards. Lionsgate also released this version on Blu-ray. Both commentary tracks are on the Blu-ray release.

Momentum Pictures released an HD DVD version of First Blood in the United Kingdom in April 2007. Lionsgate also released First Blood as a double feature on February 13, 2007, along with the 2004’s The Punisher.

The film was re-released as part of a 6-disc box set, which contains all 4 films in the series, on May 27, 2008. However the box set is missing the David Morrell commentary, even though the packaging clearly states it is included.[32] In anticipation of the release, the film was shown back in theaters for one night, May 15, 2008, through Fathom Events.[33]

[edit] References

  1. ^ “Steve Mcqueen Bio”. Yuddy.com. http://www.yuddy.com/celebrity/steve-mcqueen/bio. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  2. ^ “Trivia for First Blood. IMDb.com. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083944/trivia. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  3. ^ “Filming locations of First Blood in Hope, BC, Canada”. http://homepages.ulb.ac.be/~rgeerts/scenarioschrijven/1hope.html. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  4. ^ “Box Office Information for First Blood. Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=firstblood.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  5. ^ “Box Office Information for E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=et.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  6. ^ “1982 Yearly Box Office Results”. Box Office Mojo. http://boxofficemojo.com/yearly/chart/?yr=1982&p=.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  7. ^ “Box Office Information for Rocky III. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=rocky3.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  8. ^ “Box Office Information for Blade Runner. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=bladerunner.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  9. ^ “Box Office Information for Poltergeist. Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=poltergeist.htm. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  10. ^ “First Blood (1982): Reviews”. Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/video/titles/firstblood?q=First%20Blood#critics. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  11. ^ “The Greatest Films of 1982”. AMC Filmsite.org. http://www.filmsite.org/1982.html. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  12. ^ “The 10 Best Movies of 1982”. Film.com. http://www.film.com/features/story/10-best-movies-of-1982/15287150. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  13. ^ “Best Films of 1982”. listal.com. http://www.listal.com/list/best-films-of-1982-stephenhkoontz. Retrieved July 15, 2010. 
  14. ^ “Most Popular Feature Films Released in 1982”. IMDb.com. http://www.imdb.com/year/1982. Retrieved May 22, 2010. 
  15. ^ First Blood Movie Review, Roger Ebert”. Chicago Sun-Times. January 1, 1982. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19820101/REVIEWS/201010324/1023. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  16. ^ “BBC Film Reviews, First Blood”. BBC. http://www.bbc.co.uk/films/2000/11/30/first_blood_1982_review.shtml. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  17. ^ First Blood: A movie review by James Berardinelli”. ReelViews. http://www.reelviews.net/php_review_template.php?identifier=1511. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  18. ^ “The Rambo Series, Movie Reviews”. Reel Film Views. http://www.reelfilm.com/rambo.htm#1. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  19. ^ First Blood Movie Review”. ericdsnider.com. http://www.ericdsnider.com/movies/first-blood/. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  20. ^ First Blood Movie Reviews, Pictures”. Rotten Tomatoes. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/first_blood/. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  21. ^ First Blood, DVD Reviews”. Film Freak Central. http://filmfreakcentral.net/dvdreviews/rambotrilogy.htm. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  22. ^ “Apollo Movie Guide’s Review of First Blood. Apollo Guide. http://apolloguide.com/mov_fullrev.asp?CID=1019. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  23. ^ Maltin, Leonard (2009), p. 462. Leonard Maltin’s 2010 Movie Guide. ISBN 978-0-452-29557-5. Signet Books. Accessed October 21, 2010.
  24. ^ First Blood, DVD Reviews”. Film Freak Central. http://filmfreakcentral.net/dvdreviews/rambotrilogy.htm. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 
  25. ^ Empire’s The 500 Greatest Movies of All Time”. Empire Magazine. http://www.empireonline.com/500/48.asp. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  26. ^ “The 50 Greatest Heroes and the 50 Greatest Villains of All Time: The 400 Nominated Characters”. AFI.com. http://connect.afi.com/site/DocServer/handv400.pdf?docID=245. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  27. ^ “America’s Most Heart-Pounding Movies: The 400 Nominated Films”. AFI.com. http://connect.afi.com/site/DocServer/thrills400.pdf?docID=249. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  28. ^ “First Blood (1982): Reviews”. Rotten Tomatoes. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/first_blood/. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  29. ^ “First Blood (1982): Reviews”. Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/video/titles/firstblood?q=First%20Blood#critics. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  30. ^ Carter, Mike (2011). “Naked Edge”. Blade (F&W Media) 39 (5): 126–130. 
  31. ^ The Simpsons: Separate Vocations Movie Connections”. IMDb.com. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0701204/movieconnections. Retrieved May 21, 2010. 
  32. ^ “Rambo (2008): DVD and BluRay Details”. MoviesOnline.ca. http://www.moviesonline.ca/movienews_14332.html. Retrieved July 18, 2010. [dead link]
  33. ^ First Blood, In Select Movie Theaters Nationwide”. Fathom Events. http://www.fathomevents.com/premiere/event/firstblood.aspx. Retrieved July 18, 2010. 

[edit] External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: First Blood
[show]v·d·eRamboVideo games

Other

Characters

 
First Blood (1982)
Soundtrack • Novel
Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985)
Soundtrack • Novel  • Games
Rambo III (1988)
Soundtrack • Novel  • Game
Rambo (2008)
Soundtrack
 
 
David Morrell • Jimmy Lile • Gil Hibben • Rambo and the Forces of Freedom • The Intruder • Son of Rambow
 
[show]v·d·eWorks of Sylvester StalloneDirector

Writer

Producer

Soundtrack

Related articles

 
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rocky IV (1985) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010) · The Expendables 2 (2012)
 
The Lords of Flatbush (1974) · Rocky (1976) · F.I.S.T. (1978) · Paradise Alley (1978) · Rocky II (1979) · Rocky III (1982) · First Blood (1982) · Staying Alive (1983) · Rhinestone (1984) · Rambo: First Blood Part II (1985) · Rocky IV (1985) · Cobra (1986) · Over the Top (1987) · Rambo III (1988) · Rocky V (1990) · Cliffhanger (1993) · Driven (2001) · Rocky Balboa (2006) · Rambo (2008) · The Expendables (2010) · The Expendables 2 (2012)
 
Staying Alive (1983) · Heart of a Champion: The Ray Mancini Story (1985) · Driven (2001) · The Contender (2005–present)
 
Paradise Alley (1978) · Rhinestone (1984)
 
[show]v·d·eFilms directed by Ted Kotcheff1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

 
 
 
First Blood (1982) · Uncommon Valor (1983) · Joshua Then and Now (1985) · Switching Channels (1988) · Winter People (1989) · Weekend at Bernie’s (1989)
 
Folks! (1992) · The Shooter (1995)

View page ratings
Rate this page
Rate this page
Page ratings
Please take a moment to rate this page.
Current average ratings.

Trustworthy

5.0
1 ratings

Objective

5.0
1 ratings

Complete

4.0
1 ratings

Well-written

5.0
1 ratings

Saved successfully
Your ratings have expired

Please reevaluate this page and submit new ratings.An error has occured. Please try again later.Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.Please take a moment to complete a short survey.Maybe later Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.Did you want to create an account?An account will help you track your edits, get involved in discussions, and be a part of the community.orMaybe later Thanks! Your ratings have been saved.Did you know that you can edit this page?Maybe later

Personal tools

Namespaces

Variants

Actions

// // // //

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment